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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New GT-Line RWD.
The car exceeds our (very high) expectations. We are thrilled.
Probably the best car we have ever had.
It drives like a really good GT car. Connected to the road but never harsh. Very confident.
Reminds me of the old "Ultimate Driving Machine" BMW's.
In particular our beloved 1972 3.0CS.

I was expecting steering and handling to be on a par with our Audi A4 (which the EV6 will replace).
But, driven on the same roads the EV6 is much better and much more engaging than the Audi
The EV6 steering even told me about a slippery patch on the road where our VW Golf Alltrack also gives you feedback, but the Audi never does.

All-in-all, on curvy back roads, freeway driving and in-town driving:
Just in a different class.

Wheel Tire Car Plant Vehicle


Our only problem: The two volume manual is terrible at telling you how to do simple things.
It takes a lot of work and some experimentation to figure everything out.

My latest challenge:
How to access the 12V battery.
We will be leaving on a trip next week.
The cars will be in the garage for the duration.
With other EV's I understand that you need to put the 12V battery on a trickle charger — just as you do with an ICE car.
But the EV6 manual says Don't Do This
Instead: disconnect the battery and remove it from the car.
Re-install it when you return and re-set a few things.
More of a hassle.
But not all that bad.

Problem number 1: The manual does not even tell you where the12V battery is!
Found it in the front, partially under the storage bin.
Even has a handle on it to make it easier lift out and carry.

Hood Plant Trunk Vehicle Automotive exterior


Problem number 2:
It is clear that the right hand portion of the bin has to be removed to access the battery.
But I am stumped at how to do this.

The arrow suggests that you pull this section to the right.
But it doesn't budge.
And it doesn't pull up.

I suspect that there are clips on the side.
But nothing moves when I try to push on them.

Hood Bumper Automotive exterior Automotive lighting Vehicle door


This is all plastic.
I don't want to break anything.

There has to be a trick
I am certain someone smarter than me has figured it out.

Thanks!!
 

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Snow White Pearl GT-Line AWD
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Beautiful car. I’ll have my GT-line AWD Snow White Pearl in a couple weeks.

I think it just pulls off. I don’t thing your pulling hard enough.
 

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EV6 GT-Line (AWD) White
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I had a dead 12V on my KIA EV6 so had to jump start it... you just pull moderatly on that flap that is partially over the 12V battery and it comes loose...just dont use any excessive force..

But I honestly dont think you would need to do this for a few weeks away.. multiple months yes :D
 

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A dumb trickle charger is a no-no. They don't lower the voltage properly (float voltage) for long term storage and will boil the battery. But, a smart one, like a battery tender, should be fine. Ive kept motorcycle batteries, RVs, and cars one on for months at a time. Granted, these are all lead acid.

Don't have our EV6 yet, but if it's an AGM battery, you'll need a battery tender that's for AGM. Our other 2021 KIAs both have AGM so I'm guessing it's an AGM.

Im not affilaited with kia in anyway, but I'm guessing they think that people may use trickle chargers and not smart float chargers.
 

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Snow White Pearl GT-Line AWD
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A dumb trickle charger is a no-no. They don't lower the voltage properly (float voltage) for long term storage and will boil the battery. But, a smart one, like a battery tender, should be fine. Ive kept motorcycle batteries, RVs, and cars one on for months at a time. Granted, these are all lead acid.

Don't have our EV6 yet, but if it's an AGM battery, you'll need a battery tender that's for AGM. Our other 2021 KIAs both have AGM so I'm guessing it's an AGM.

Im not affilaited with kia in anyway, but I'm guessing they think that people may use trickle chargers and not smart float chargers.
If you look at photos of the EV6 and look up the battery number, it’s a standard sealed battery. Not AGM.
 

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New GT-Line RWD.
The car exceeds our (very high) expectations. We are thrilled.
Probably the best car we have ever had.
It drives like a really good GT car. Connected to the road but never harsh. Very confident.
Reminds me of the old "Ultimate Driving Machine" BMW's.
In particular our beloved 1972 3.0CS.

I was expecting steering and handling to be on a par with our Audi A4 (which the EV6 will replace).
But, driven on the same roads the EV6 is much better and much more engaging than the Audi
The EV6 steering even told me about a slippery patch on the road where our VW Golf Alltrack also gives you feedback, but the Audi never does.

All-in-all, on curvy back roads, freeway driving and in-town driving:
Just in a different class.

View attachment 3128

Our only problem: The two volume manual is terrible at telling you how to do simple things.
It takes a lot of work and some experimentation to figure everything out.

My latest challenge:
How to access the 12V battery.
We will be leaving on a trip next week.
The cars will be in the garage for the duration.
With other EV's I understand that you need to put the 12V battery on a trickle charger — just as you do with an ICE car.
But the EV6 manual says Don't Do This
Instead: disconnect the battery and remove it from the car.
Re-install it when you return and re-set a few things.
More of a hassle.
But not all that bad.

Problem number 1: The manual does not even tell you where the12V battery is!
Found it in the front, partially under the storage bin.
Even has a handle on it to make it easier lift out and carry.

View attachment 3126

Problem number 2:
It is clear that the right hand portion of the bin has to be removed to access the battery.
But I am stumped at how to do this.

The arrow suggests that you pull this section to the right.
But it doesn't budge.
And it doesn't pull up.

I suspect that there are clips on the side.
But nothing moves when I try to push on them.

View attachment 3127

This is all plastic.
I don't want to break anything.

There has to be a trick
I am certain someone smarter than me has figured it out.

Thanks!!

If it is just for a couple weeks, don't worry about it. Just give the car a full charge before you leave. The main battery charges the 12 volt battery. An orange light will illuminate from the top of the dashboard when this process is taking place.

If you just want to disconnect the 12 volt battery from the system, remove the negative terminal at the rear and that will isolate it from the system. You can loosen that terminal nut without having to remove the EV storage bin.

If you want to remove the 12 volt battery, you need to loosen the EV storage bin. Remove the four 10mm bolts on the front side and the two 10mm bolts on back side. Lift the bin to the side but be careful of the wire connected to a component on the right, front corner of the bin. You will then have access to the battery.


As to the EV6 driving like a BMW, the lead designer was Albert Biermann from the BMW "M" Group. I do miss my 1973 3.0 CS. But this is a phenomenal replacement!

 

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I have a 10 watt solar panel that has a 5 volt USB A output at 1 Amp. If I plug this into USB port on center console will it charge the 12 volt battery or not? Guesses please.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Try this Dead 12V battery issue – Kia EV6 (wordpress.com) ...looks the same

My web site has a stack of this sort of stuff. In thuis case search for "12V"

Try this too Kia official ‘how to’ videos – Kia EV6 (wordpress.com)
Thanks so much!!
Video was excellent.
Not only showed me that it is OK to simply pull up on that section of the frunk to remove it.
But the little hand-held jump start charger he had looked super useful.

I immediately ordered a similar gadget from AMZ.
Looks like something you should have with any car.
No more jump starting from another car.
If it is just for a couple weeks, don't worry about it. Just give the car a full charge before you leave. The main battery charges the 12 volt battery. An orange light will illuminate from the top of the dashboard when this process is taking place.

If you just want to disconnect the 12 volt battery from the system, remove the negative terminal at the rear and that will isolate it from the system. You can loosen that terminal nut without having to remove the EV storage bin.

If you want to remove the 12 volt battery, you need to loosen the EV storage bin. Remove the four 10mm bolts on the front side and the two 10mm bolts on back side. Lift the bin to the side but be careful of the wire connected to a component on the right, front corner of the bin. You will then have access to the battery.


As to the EV6 driving like a BMW, the lead designer was Albert Biermann from the BMW "M" Group. I do miss my 1973 3.0 CS. But this is a phenomenal replacement!

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If it is just for a couple weeks, don't worry about it. Just give the car a full charge before you leave. The main battery charges the 12 volt battery. An orange light will illuminate from the top of the dashboard when this process is taking place.

If you just want to disconnect the 12 volt battery from the system, remove the negative terminal at the rear and that will isolate it from the system. You can loosen that terminal nut without having to remove the EV storage bin.

If you want to remove the 12 volt battery, you need to loosen the EV storage bin. Remove the four 10mm bolts on the front side and the two 10mm bolts on back side. Lift the bin to the side but be careful of the wire connected to a component on the right, front corner of the bin. You will then have access to the battery.


As to the EV6 driving like a BMW, the lead designer was Albert Biermann from the BMW "M" Group. I do miss my 1973 3.0 CS. But this is a phenomenal replacement!

Thanks so much.
The manual says to remove the battery. But just disconnecting the negative terminal sounds a LOT easier.
I will do that.

I am well aware of Biermann's role in developing the EV6.
He had joined Hyundai in 2015.
A few years after Hyundai had hired Audi chief stylist Peter Schreyer.
I believe that the EV6 was Biermann's last car before retired.

I had read that Biermann is responsible for more than just the marvelous chassis tuning.
The story is that he felt (quite correctly) that the original EV6 body design was bland and did not reflect his vision of the car that this could be.
So, early in COVID, he locked the design team up in a facility in Austria — along with a Lancia Stratos for inspiration.

Whether or not that is true, you can certainly see how the little Stratos inspired the design of the EV6:
The crouching stance
The rise of the body from front to back.
The way that the EV6 designers integrated the Stratos add-on rear spoiler by creating a swoop that starts behind the front wheels and rises up to form the spoiler,
The aerodynamic slope to the windshield — with roof that slopes down to the back.
The wing at the back of the roof that directs the air down the back of the car to reduce turbulence.

Of course there is also a nice helping of space ship in there as well.
But, for me, it is that stance and the Stratos-inspired touches that give the EV6 such a strong emotional appeal..

What ever happened to your 3.0 CS?
We purchased ours used in 1975.
At the time I did not know that it had come from northern NJ where they still used salt on the roads in winter.
Nor did I recall that the body was made by Karmann.
There had been a saying in sports car/rally circles: "The Italians invented rust. Karmann perfected the process."
That, sadly, eventually proved to be true with our CS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If it is just for a couple weeks, don't worry about it. Just give the car a full charge before you leave. The main battery charges the 12 volt battery. An orange light will illuminate from the top of the dashboard when this process is taking place.

If you just want to disconnect the 12 volt battery from the system, remove the negative terminal at the rear and that will isolate it from the system. You can loosen that terminal nut without having to remove the EV storage bin.

If you want to remove the 12 volt battery, you need to loosen the EV storage bin. Remove the four 10mm bolts on the front side and the two 10mm bolts on back side. Lift the bin to the side but be careful of the wire connected to a component on the right, front corner of the bin. You will then have access to the battery.


As to the EV6 driving like a BMW, the lead designer was Albert Biermann from the BMW "M" Group. I do miss my 1973 3.0 CS. But this is a phenomenal replacement!

Thanks so much.
The manual says to remove the battery. But just disconnecting the negative terminal sounds a LOT easier.
I will do that.

I am well aware of Biermann's role in developing the EV6.
He had joined Hyundai in 2015.
A few years after Hyundai had hired Audi chief stylist Peter Schreyer.
I believe that the EV6 was Biermann's last car before retired.

I had read that Biermann is responsible for more than just the marvelous chassis tuning.
The story is that he felt (quite correctly) that the original EV6 body design was bland and did not reflect his vision of the car that this could be.
So, early in COVID, he locked the design team up in a facility in Austria — along with a Lancia Stratos for inspiration.

Whether or not that is true, you can certainly see how the little Stratos inspired the design of the EV6:
The crouching stance
The rise of the body from front to back.
The way that the EV6 designers integrated the Stratos add-on rear spoiler by creating a swoop that starts behind the front wheels and rises up to form the spoiler,
The aerodynamic slope to the windshield — with roof that slopes down to the back.
The wing at the back of the roof that directs the air down the back of the car to reduce turbulence.

Of course there is also a nice helping of space ship in there as well.
But, for me, it is that stance and the Stratos-inspired touches that give the EV6 such a strong emotional appeal..

What ever happened to your 3.0 CS?
We purchased ours used in 1975.
At the time I did not know that it had come from northern NJ where they still used salt on the roads in winter.
Nor did I recall that the body was made by Karmann.
There had been a saying in sports car/rally circles: "The Italians invented rust. Karmann perfected the process."
That, sadly, eventually proved to be true with our CS.
If it is just for a couple weeks, don't worry about it. Just give the car a full charge before you leave. The main battery charges the 12 volt battery. An orange light will illuminate from the top of the dashboard when this process is taking place.

If you just want to disconnect the 12 volt battery from the system, remove the negative terminal at the rear and that will isolate it from the system. You can loosen that terminal nut without having to remove the EV storage bin.

If you want to remove the 12 volt battery, you need to loosen the EV storage bin. Remove the four 10mm bolts on the front side and the two 10mm bolts on back side. Lift the bin to the side but be careful of the wire connected to a component on the right, front corner of the bin. You will then have access to the battery.


As to the EV6 driving like a BMW, the lead designer was Albert Biermann from the BMW "M" Group. I do miss my 1973 3.0 CS. But this is a phenomenal replacement!

Lancia Stratos
First purpose-built rally car.
Ferrari Dino V6 engine.
Dominated rallies from the early 1970's well into the 1980's.

Wheel Tire Car Vehicle Hood
 

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Thanks so much.
The manual says to remove the battery. But just disconnecting the negative terminal sounds a LOT easier.
I will do that.

I am well aware of Biermann's role in developing the EV6.
He had joined Hyundai in 2015.
A few years after Hyundai had hired Audi chief stylist Peter Schreyer.
I believe that the EV6 was Biermann's last car before retired.

I had read that Biermann is responsible for more than just the marvelous chassis tuning.
The story is that he felt (quite correctly) that the original EV6 body design was bland and did not reflect his vision of the car that this could be.
So, early in COVID, he locked the design team up in a facility in Austria — along with a Lancia Stratos for inspiration.

Whether or not that is true, you can certainly see how the little Stratos inspired the design of the EV6:
The crouching stance
The rise of the body from front to back.
The way that the EV6 designers integrated the Stratos add-on rear spoiler by creating a swoop that starts behind the front wheels and rises up to form the spoiler,
The aerodynamic slope to the windshield — with roof that slopes down to the back.
The wing at the back of the roof that directs the air down the back of the car to reduce turbulence.

Of course there is also a nice helping of space ship in there as well.
But, for me, it is that stance and the Stratos-inspired touches that give the EV6 such a strong emotional appeal..

What ever happened to your 3.0 CS?
We purchased ours used in 1975.
At the time I did not know that it had come from northern NJ where they still used salt on the roads in winter.
Nor did I recall that the body was made by Karmann.
There had been a saying in sports car/rally circles: "The Italians invented rust. Karmann perfected the process."
That, sadly, eventually proved to be true with our CS.
I bought my CS used in the late 80’s. The Ghia bodies were made with high carbon steel. Closing the door was similar to the sensation of a bank vault but it would rust if you breathed on it heavily. I became quite proficient with a MIG welder. A love/hate relationship that lasted six years before I found another individual smitten by the beauty of this time bandit.
 

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Update on the battery access...

If you just want access to the terminals for charging, you can remove the panel on the right side of the bin. It's possible to remove the battery from this slot but moving the bin over would be less stressful.

Hood Automotive tire Finger Automotive exterior Bumper


Push out the clip in the upper, right hand corner and pull up on the panel.

Motor vehicle Hood Automotive exterior Trunk Automotive tire


Hood Automotive tire Finger Automotive exterior Bumper
Motor vehicle Hood Automotive exterior Trunk Automotive tire
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
THAT's what I was looking for!
I figured that that had to be some sort of clip.
I had tried pushing it, but it didn't budge.

Just tried it your way and it worked!

In the process, I confirmed what I had suspected:
I had thought that the storage compartment on our RWD car was way too small.
Looked like the pics of the front storage bin on the AWD cars.
Sure enough, there is a little sticker on our lid that says 4WD.
I looked under the bin and saw that there is a ton of empty space down there.
The bin appears to be held in place by a few screws.
So I should be able to get a Kia dealer to order my a RWD bin and simply swap out the 4WD one.
That will give me the useful front storage space that I had expected to get.
Rather than the pitiful little compartment you get with the AWD cars.

Thanks!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
According to my dealer there is no such thing as a larger frunk from Kia.
The AWD models have a motor to drive the front wheels.
The RWD models do not.
So the AWD models have a shallow compartment that sits above the front motor.
The RWD models have a considerably deeper compartment that extends down into the space that is occupied by the motor in the AWD cars.

Our RWD car has a shallow AWD compartment.
It even has a label that says "AWD".
I am asking Kia to replace this with the deeper RWD compartment that should have been installed in this car.
 

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Kia EV6 Wind
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We don't have a definitive answer from Kia, but all of the US RWD cars have the shallow frunk. The theory is that it's US regulations regarding trunk escape releases: 49 CFR § 571.401 - Standard No. 401; Interior trunk release. . The deep frunk appears to be just large enough to be covered, so rather than coming up with an escape latch, they just put in the AWD shallow frunk.

The only way to get it in the US would be a grey market import.
 
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