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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a scenario that I would like to have expert advice on regarding autonomy.
Let's suppose I am stuck in traffic jam, between Montréal and Gatineau, nothing is moving for 4 hours in the winter at 0 Celsius, 32F.
I am using the seat warmer only and listening to the news.
How much is the car consuming every hour? Will I have enough battery to get back home, 100 km away?
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Check out the overnight camping section of the video Bjorn Nyland road trip to Mo i Rana - Pt 1
It should use less than 1.5kWh for each hour stuck in the cold, not running the engine only the electronics, cabin heat and seat heater.
Thanks for the quick reply. This is all very new to me so pardon me for requiring additional details.
1. If I use only 1.5 kWh X 4 hrs = 6 kWh, how does that relate to my battery size?.
2. Then I have to get home: let's assume there still is 50 kWh (50 to 70%?) of energy in my battery, and I am driving home 100 km away, at a speed of 100 km/h, 0 Celcius I will use about 20 kWh?
3. Finally if my EV6 uses a maximum of 18 kWh /100 km (not sure if my figure makes sense here) and the battery size is 77.4 kWh I can drive roughly 430 km (77.4/18)?

I guess am still at the first grade school for my beginners EV 101 course, thank you for helping.⚡🔌💡
 

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First, Wh and kWh are units of stored energy. 1 kWh will run 1,000 W for 1 hr, or 100 W for 10 hrs. It's the same unit used to bill electricity to your home. If you have 77.4 kWh to start with, and you draw 1kW for 1 hr, you'll have 76.4 kWh left.

Another way to look at it. In the GT-Line your battery is 77.4 kWh. If you use 6 kWh of it, you'd use 7.8% of total capacity. If the battery was at 100% when you started that 4-hr period, it would go down to 92%. If it was at 50% it would go down to 42%.

The amount of kWh used per 100km is similar to driving a gas ("ICE") vehicle, in that various factors impact what your fuel economy is at the time. EVs use their stored energy to power the electronics in the vehicle (e.g. the screen, charging your phone on the charging mat), the climate control, battery heating/cooling, and the majority goes to moving the vehicle. Faster speeds = more wind drag = more energy required per km. How you drive, the terrain, the rolling resistance of the tires & the surface you're driving on, your speed and how constant it is, etc. All will be factors.

The efficiency ratings you see for vehicles are either from standardized testing (e.g. EPA, NRCAN) or from a youtuber calculating based on their own use. But "your mileage may vary" was never truer than right here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
First, Wh and kWh are units of stored energy. 1 kWh will run 1,000 W for 1 hr, or 100 W for 10 hrs. It's the same unit used to bill electricity to your home. If you have 77.4 kWh to start with, and you draw 1kW for 1 hr, you'll have 76.4 kWh left.

Another way to look at it. In the GT-Line your battery is 77.4 kWh. If you use 6 kWh of it, you'd use 7.8% of total capacity. If the battery was at 100% when you started that 4-hr period, it would go down to 92%. If it was at 50% it would go down to 42%.

The amount of kWh used per 100km is similar to driving a gas ("ICE") vehicle, in that various factors impact what your fuel economy is at the time. EVs use their stored energy to power the electronics in the vehicle (e.g. the screen, charging your phone on the charging mat), the climate control, battery heating/cooling, and the majority goes to moving the vehicle. Faster speeds = more wind drag = more energy required per km. How you drive, the terrain, the rolling resistance of the tires & the surface you're driving on, your speed and how constant it is, etc. All will be factors.

The efficiency ratings you see for vehicles are either from standardized testing (e.g. EPA, NRCAN) or from a youtuber calculating based on their own use. But "your mileage may vary" was never truer than right here.
Excellent reply. Thanks. I received a call from the sales director of the dealership where i made a deposit for the EV6 and he confirmed to me that Kia has allocated the car i ordered 1 month ago. I am one of the 200 Canadians. So now y research for details will continue with a lot e enthusiasm. More questions to come undoubtedly. Have a great day.
 
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