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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm getting an EV6 GT Line S AWD and wondering what is the best charge level to limit to for good battery life. Everyone says 80% is best generally but that will probably only give me 200 miles range at 70mph. I have seen mention of a built-in battery buffer but unsure if that is true or whether it is significant enough to allow regular charging to 90% or 100% without battery degradation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you need 90 or 100% daily? If not, stick to 80%. If you do, well than I would say try to limit it to 90% and once in a while charge to 100%.
2-3 times a month, every month it would allow a regular out-return journey without charging, seems silly to cut range by 20% if it's an unnecessary caution, and that's what I want to know.
 

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...seems silly to cut range by 20% if it's an unnecessary caution
And similarly, it seems silly to charge more than necessary. Minimizing depth of discharge is one the primary ways to improve battery longevity. Only charge as much as you need, with an attempt to keep the average charge in the middle of the pack's capacity. When you need more range, charge it more. If you want to maximize battery longevity, just follow the the known guidelines: BU-808: How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries
 

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2-3 times a month, every month it would allow a regular out-return journey without charging, seems silly to cut range by 20% if it's an unnecessary caution, and that's what I want to know.
This is about the same as me... I am charging to 80% at home only when it drops to 20/30% but then charge to 100% before the long drive. Occasional 100% will not harm it but charging it every day and holding at maximum charge and never discharging will reduce life.
 

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When we say battery life or longevity, what are we talking here, time and loss of battery performance or charge?

Does anyone know?
 

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Use it and abuse it, will be many years down the line before any battery degradation shows, doubt you will still own it..

Our First Kona did 77k miles charged every night to 100% Rapid Charged most days, was still at 100% State of Health when it went back

Are we going back to the 1950s Home Garage Flat Cap Mechanics here telling us to change the oil every 3k and grease the nipples weekly..

Modern Cars are consumables use them as such, to your convenience

However you treat it, Out Of Date Electronics are more likely to be the cause of its downfall, long beforethe battery is stuffed.
 

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KIA Denmark made a FAQ, where they informs, that charging to 70 % would make the battery last twice as long as charging it to 80 %. You should also only charge to 100 % when you expect to drive immediately after charging. The manual doesn't state anything on either though.
 

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KIA Denmark made a FAQ, where they informs, that charging to 70 % would make the battery last twice as long as charging it to 80 %. You should also only charge to 100 % when you expect to drive immediately after charging. The manual doesn't state anything on either though.
OK thank you, so the issue is really not for the first owner unless your going to own the car longer then the Kia 7 year warranty.
 
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I asked this on SpeakEV under ''100% charge'' listing, as my EV6 was fully charged and would remain at 100% for around 17 days before collection from my dealer.
From the Kia press office
# 7. For EV & Plug-in Hybrid vehicles it is recommended that the high voltage battery is left in a fully charged state.
At my request dealer did run it down using climate control to around 80%,but would have been okay at 100% according to Kia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is about the same as me... I am charging to 80% at home only when it drops to 20/30% but then charge to 100% before the long drive. Occasional 100% will not harm it but charging it every day and holding at maximum charge and never discharging will reduce life.
I certainly wouldn't be holding ot at 100% every day but (not getting at you) what does "occasional" mean? Once a month? Once a week? If there is a built-in buffer, the 100% is not actually 100% so will not do any damage regardless and that is what I want to know. Kia don't seem to offer any advice on this, at least I can't see anything in the online manual which seems to be very short on any detail.
 

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People need to stop looking for black/white answers on this topic. It's not like charging to 100% will cause immediate harm to the battery, but charging to 80% will result in 0 degradation. Lithium batteries, like all batteries, DO age, and their performance drops as they do. How you use them can affect how fast they age. There is plenty of testing data out there if you search for it. Repeatedly using a 100% DoD will age a battery slightly faster than 80%. 80% will age faster than 75%. 75 faster than 70... Whether or not you'll actually notice any performance drop during the time you have the car will vary from one person to the next. It's really quite simple... if you need the full capacity of the battery, then by all means charge it up to 100%. But for times when you don't, how much of an inconvenience is it to adjust your charge based on expected usage? I suppose there are people out there who never know on a daily basis if they're going to be sitting at home or taking a 300m road trip, but I would think MOST people have reasonably predictable usage. If you can't predict your usage, or if you simply don't want to bother, charge it as you please and don't worry about it. You may not notice any difference before you trade it in anyway. If you're someone who likes to optimize things to the nth degree, then charge only as much as you need, with the goal of keeping the average charge level around 50%, and as frequently as possible to reduce the min & max. And only use fast charging when necessary.
 

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I learned AC or slow charging is relatively harmless to 90 or even 100%. Rapid charging is causing 'more' damage as the battery gets heated more.
Last 6 years with my PHEV Passat GTE I did not experience any range loss although it was charged to 100% daily
 

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The battery of the Kia EV6 GT has an estimated total capacity of 82.5 kWh. The usable capacity is 77.4.


Therefore when you charge to 100%, you are actually only using 93.8% of the total capacity.

I’m just going to charge it however I feel like it on any given day.
 

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We have a 6 year old Leaf and a 2 week old EV6.
We’ve always home charged the Leaf, always to 100%, and always used it for at least 20 miles the next day. It still has full battery capacity. And that’s (supposedly) older battery tech than the EV6.
So I wouldn’t worry too much, these EV batteries are turning out to be really robust.
Just don’t do tons of DC charging and leaving it at 100% for days.
Also..if you charge the EV6 to ‘90%’ then in reality you’re charging to 84% of total battery capacity (i.e. 70kw charge out of 82kw actually battery)
 

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This is an extremely important question and should not be dismissed.

Not all batteries are the same. I own a Tesla Model 3 and it is paramount that I follow 20-80 percent charge rule. My battery already has degraded 20 miles less at full capacity. This is due to the type of battery Tesla used for the 2019 Model 3 (18650). Earlier versions of Model 3 batteries (2170 ) did not have the requirement and could be charged at 100%. Plus the battery had very little loss for the 1st 100,000 miles.

The reason why Tesla went with a different battery is that the newer battery tolerated weather better and the capacity. Therefor it weighed less, less batteries required and made the car cheaper to build. Personally, I much prefer the older battery technology as I am dismayed I have to follow the 20-80 rule and lost mileage in such a short amount of time.

So, if anyone knows the type of battery please reply as this could affect my decision on purchasing another EV at this time.
 

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AFAIK, it’s a pouch cell design (so not cylindrical like Tesla) and it’s a NMC 811. That’s the extent that I know. Hopefully others can chime in with more details.
 

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AFAIK, it’s a pouch cell design (so not cylindrical like Tesla) and it’s a NMC 811. That’s the extent that I know. Hopefully others can chime in with more details.
NMC 811 = nickel, manganese & cobalt in the ratio 80%, 10% & 10%.

A higher nickel content gives better charging performance and higher energy density. However, as the nickel content increases, stability is reduced. Historically, polyolefin separators have been used but these have had to be treated with ceramic coatings to cope with increasing higher nickel contents.

In about 3 years, NMC 9 0.5 0.5 batteries will be commercialised. These will have 90% nickel but will require a completely different separator construction. They could either be smaller batteries with the same capacity, or same size with higher capacity. In the industry, they talk about 9.x.x batteries.
 
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