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There is no "better" in terms of operation. The 6-50 outlet only requires a 3-conductor cable (or individual conductors in conduit) to your breaker panel, while the 14-50 requires a 4-conductor cable. If the distance between the EVSE and the panel is more than a few feet going with 6-50 will potentially save you a few bucks. FWIW, the 14-50 is commonly used as a 120/240 volt supply for recreational vehicles, so if you have one of those the 14-50 might be a better choice.
 

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Usually you will be paying a guy for his time and the drops. Adding another conductor to get the 14-50 will be minimal in most cases. I think the 14-50 will give you more flexibility in the future. Might as well have as many options for the future then need the 120 V for some reason and pay the guy to come back out.
 

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Check the prices of 6-3 NM-B cable versus 6-2 NM-B cable; the 6-3 is nearly 50% more expensive at your local big box store for that extra conductor ($6.73 per foot versus $4.64 for NM-B with stranded conductors at the local Lowes). A run with individual conductors in conduit using #6 stranded THHN is in the same ballpark ($1.68/foot per conductor, or $6.72 versus $5.04 per foot). The expense of that additional conductor when you're dealing with a 40-foot or longer run can add up. Your mileage may vary of course.
 

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Is it better to install chargepoint home flex with 6-50 nema or 14-50 plug.

Also any electrician references in Bergen county , new Jersey
I just had a NEMA 6-50 installed last because I got a $250 instant rebate by buying it from the local power company, and the only one they had was the 6-50. I had an electrician wire my garage with an outlet and the ChargePoint mounted on the wall for $600. Total cost to set up my garage was $1,100. But wait, there's more! I also applied for an additional $250 cash rebate for having my garage wired, total out of pocket once everything settles in, $850. I'm happy with that.
 

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2022 EV6 GT-Line AWD Aurora Black Pearl
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The negatives of hard wiring the charger is that you can't take it with you and if you have to replace it then you'll have to get an electrician to hardwire the new one. The NEMA outlet provides more flexibility.
The flip side of that is that the connection between the plug and the socket is not as solid as the hard-wire connection of the wire to the terminals, and it will generate some heat. Over time the socket will wear out and ... you'll need that same electrician to come in and replace the socket. Half a dozen of one, six of the other. Take your pick. Neither's a particularly expensive job, however. I'd make the decision based on whether I wanted the EVSE to be portable. If not, I'd hardwire it; it's one less thing that could fail. If it's outdoors, I'd hardwire it so it doesn't walk.
 

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2022 Kia EV6 GT-Line AWD Yacht Blue
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The negatives of hard wiring the charger is that you can't take it with you and if you have to replace it then you'll have to get an electrician to hardwire the new one. The NEMA outlet provides more flexibility.
I own the house and we have no plans of moving in the next 10 years or so... have no desire to take it with me anywhere.. I'd rather have the faster charging capability of the hardwired 60 amp circuit. If I had a need for a portable level 2 charger I'd probably buy one of the many 5 star rated combo lvl 1/2 portable chargers on Amazon. In the even that I did need to replace the EVSE because it shit out or if I wanted to put something better in eventually... I could easily cut the power and rewire it myself at that point.
 

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I own the house and we have no plans of moving in the next 10 years or so... have no desire to take it with me anywhere.. I'd rather have the faster charging capability of the hardwired 60 amp circuit. If I had a need for a portable level 2 charger I'd probably buy one of the many 5 star rated combo lvl 1/2 portable chargers on Amazon. In the even that I did need to replace the EVSE because it shit out or if I wanted to put something better in eventually... I could easily cut the power and rewire it myself at that point.
I'm a little ignorant about electricity, wiring, etc so I want to make sure I understand correctly. If you hardwire a level 2 charger that supports up to 50 amps such as the ChargePoint CPH50 to a 60 amp circuit instead of a NEMA 14-50 or 6-50 outlet, are you saying that it will charge faster?
 

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I'm a little ignorant about electricity, wiring, etc so I want to make sure I understand correctly. If you hardwire a level 2 charger that supports up to 50 amps such as the ChargePoint CPH50 to a 60 amp circuit instead of a NEMA 14-50 or 6-50 outlet, are you saying that it will charge faster?
Essentially, yes. You can run 80% of a circuits capacity safely I believe. So on a 60 amp circuit you can run 48 amps. The Chargepoint Flex gets its name from being able to be set for various amperage outputs. On a 50 amp circuit you'd only be able to run it at 40 amps and on a 40 amp circuit, only 32 amps and so on.

Its not a huge difference...but it cost me literally like 2 dollars more than having him run a 50 or 40 amp circuit since it was about 3 feet from my breaker box. On the ID.4 I believe that running at 40 amps got you about 27 miles per hour charge and 48 amps bumped it up to about 32.... so about 5 extra miles per hour.
 

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I'm a little ignorant about electricity, wiring, etc so I want to make sure I understand correctly. If you hardwire a level 2 charger that supports up to 50 amps such as the ChargePoint CPH50 to a 60 amp circuit instead of a NEMA 14-50 or 6-50 outlet, are you saying that it will charge faster?
The Math:

60A circuit: 48A charging * 240V = 11.5 kW
50A circuit: 40A charging * 240V = 9.6 kW

60A circuit will charge ~20% faster

I installed mine on a 14-50 mostly because I had left over wire 6/3 ROMEX wire from a hot tub install. Faster charging is cool but 20-80% at 9.6kW is less than 5 hours, don’t figure I need faster than that. Also easier to plug in a back up charger if you have issues.
 

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Essentially, yes. You can run 80% of a circuits capacity safely I believe. So on a 60 amp circuit you can run 48 amps. The Chargepoint Flex gets its name from being able to be set for various amperage outputs. On a 50 amp circuit you'd only be able to run it at 40 amps and on a 40 amp circuit, only 32 amps and so on.

Its not a huge difference...but it cost me literally like 2 dollars more than having him run a 50 or 40 amp circuit since it was about 3 feet from my breaker box. On the ID.4 I believe that running at 40 amps got you about 27 miles per hour charge and 48 amps bumped it up to about 32.... so about 5 extra miles per hour.
While it is true that you can pull 10 or 20 more amps with hard wired VS the outlet plug-in, none of that matters if your home does not have enough power running into it. If you are already at or close to your maximum power capacity usage you won't be able to pull those extra amps anyway. Honestly, I think most of this is a non-issue. If you own your home, have a secure set up, and plan to charge basically overnight, what are your power needs and how many miles are you driving in a day as it is? Unless you drive 100 + miles a day, every day, who cares? I go to a gas station once a week in my ICE car and I am rarely in need of gas when I do, its just my habit to fill up once a week, and when I reset the odometer, I'm usually in the 200-300 mile range. Hell, I have a friend who got her EV6 three weeks ago and has only charged it twice. Is it possible that we may be overthinking this? Asking for a friend....
 

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There is one additional factor concerning plug-in versus hard-wired EVSE ("charger") installations that may impact you if your locality is using the 2020 National Electrical Code. GFCI protection is now required on both 120 AND 240 volt outlets in garages and outdoor locations. Two-pole GFCI breakers cost over $100, which is a substantial bump to the installation cost.
 

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There is one additional factor concerning plug-in versus hard-wired EVSE ("charger") installations that may impact you if your locality is using the 2020 National Electrical Code. GFCI protection is now required on both 120 AND 240 volt outlets in garages and outdoor locations. Two-pole GFCI breakers cost over $100, which is a substantial bump to the installation cost.
That's another reason I hardwired. I paid $350 total for the electrical work.
 

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While it is true that you can pull 10 or 20 more amps with hard wired VS the outlet plug-in, none of that matters if your home does not have enough power running into it. If you are already at or close to your maximum power capacity usage you won't be able to pull those extra amps anyway. Honestly, I think most of this is a non-issue. If you own your home, have a secure set up, and plan to charge basically overnight, what are your power needs and how many miles are you driving in a day as it is? Unless you drive 100 + miles a day, every day, who cares? I go to a gas station once a week in my ICE car and I am rarely in need of gas when I do, its just my habit to fill up once a week, and when I reset the odometer, I'm usually in the 200-300 mile range. Hell, I have a friend who got her EV6 three weeks ago and has only charged it twice. Is it possible that we may be overthinking this? Asking for a friend....
I have more than enough power to support my 60 amp circuit going to my EVSE. House is only two years old.. no reason to not go with the faster charging..especially to try and future proof if I get a new EV 4-5 years down the road with a larger battery pack that will take longer to charge up. That 20% speed increase can make the difference between me being able to get enough juice to make a quick trip or having to go out of my way to DC fast charge while running errands.
 

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One other note if you go over a 50A breaker is that the wire has to be heavier too. 6 gauge is limited to 55A, 44A continuous; you need go to 4 gauge (70A max, 66A continuous) which is another expense.
 

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IMHO there is really no "wrong" choice in going with either a plug-in 50A circuit vs. a hardwired 60A circuit--go with whichever option best suits/fits your needs, not because you need convincing that one option is better or a more sensible one compared to the other. Me--I'm going with plug-in 50A since my home is a rental so it makes little sense to pay (extra) for a 60A hardwire option that I can't take with me if/when I move out.
 
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