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Besides getting the charger anyone have specs on what's needed in the garage?
Hardwired or 14-50 plug?
 

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Besides getting the charger anyone have specs on what's needed in the garage?
Hardwired or 14-50 plug?
Are you referring to the gift with the First Edition? The unit they are offering is the ChargePoint Home Flex charging station. The unit is a plug-in unit with either NEMA 6-50 or 14-50 plug (40 Amp maximum output).

There are other units available for sale that are hardwired. The EV6 can charge up to 11 kW on level 2 so you would need a hardwired unit than can provide up to 48 Amp maximum output requiring to be installed on a 60 Amp circuit breaker.
 

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Just like armost every EV containing a 11 kW AC charger, such power requires three-phase input, or 3 x 16A @ 400V. However, EV6 (again, like almost every EV that contains 11 kW three-phase AC charger) can take up to 32A on a single phase. That yields approx. 7.2 kW @ 240V. It is my understanding that residential apartmens in the US do not typically have three-phase current available, and thus you might be aiming at 7.2 kW and 32 amps.

White I have no knowledge of the power / current ratings of the plugs that are commonly used in the US, it might be a good idea to prefer a fixed installation of a charging station if that 7.2 kW charging power is what you will definitely need at home. White I don't know if stock priced electricity deals are available in the US, such a deal might give a reason for high charging power to fully exploit the cheap / less expensive hours.
 

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Just like armost every EV containing a 11 kW AC charger, such power requires three-phase input, or 3 x 16A @ 400V. However, EV6 (again, like almost every EV that contains 11 kW three-phase AC charger) can take up to 32A on a single phase. That yields approx. 7.2 kW @ 240V. It is my understanding that residential apartmens in the US do not typically have three-phase current available, and thus you might be aiming at 7.2 kW and 32 amps.

White I have no knowledge of the power / current ratings of the plugs that are commonly used in the US, it might be a good idea to prefer a fixed installation of a charging station if that 7.2 kW charging power is what you will definitely need at home. White I don't know if stock priced electricity deals are available in the US, such a deal might give a reason for high charging power to fully exploit the cheap / less expensive hours.
3-phase power in the U.S. is only in commercial buildings. Residential is (almost) all single phase 240 or 120-volt. There are various 240-volt outlets with the most common for EVs being 50 Amp. Hard wiring a unit allows you to go higher than 50 amps (assuming you have enough room on your electrical service).
 

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Besides getting the charger anyone have specs on what's needed in the garage?
Hardwired or 14-50 plug?
I am confused.

In all the US advertising, it states 11kw charging...a country where 3 phase home circuits are effectively nonexistent.

So what is it?
240Vx32 amp (7.2/7.7 kw)?
Or
240Vx46/48 amp (11/11.5 kw)?
 

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I am confused.

In all the US advertising, it states 11kw charging...a country where 3 phase home circuits are effectively nonexistent.

So what is it?
240Vx32 amp (7.2/7.7 kw)?
Or
240Vx46/48 amp (11/11.5 kw)?
I see 11 kW charging as well but assuming they are just rounding down from 11.5. Max charging would be 240V × 48A but requires a hardwired unit. Plug-in charging units are limited to 9.6 kW (240V × 40A)
 

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I can assume anything I want, but only KIA can supply facts (either actual specs from the in-vehicle charger, or sections from the manual)....
 

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I can assume anything I want, but only KIA can supply facts (either actual specs from the in-vehicle charger, or sections from the manual)....
So, you are concerned is is only 11 kWH instead of being able to charge at 11.52? Is that really material?
 

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So, you are concerned is is only 11 kWH instead of being able to charge at 11.52? Is that really material?
No, I'm concerned that it can't do single-phase 46/48 amp charging AT ALL, but can only do 16A+16A (running them in series) for 2 of the 3 internal phases in the charger...the 3 phases that it would take to get to 11kw (16A+16A+16A) on a 3-phase circuit.

That is the limitation for some of the chargers in many vehicles today.
 

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No, I'm concerned that it can't do single-phase 46/48 amp charging AT ALL, but can only do 16A+16A (running them in series) for 2 of the 3 internal phases in the charger...the 3 phases that it would take to get to 11kw (16A+16A+16A) on a 3-phase circuit.

That is the limitation for some of the chargers in many vehicles today.
Oh, that makes more sense.

From their site All-New 2022 Kia EV6 Crossover | Meet Your Future Electric Car | Kia (click on "At Home Charging"):

An 11kw on-board charger allows for a Level 2 240v recharge overnight from home, enabling you to have a full battery every morning.

J1772 standard is single phase only.
 

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I am currently driving Kia Niro EV containing a single-phase AC charger that takes up to 32A at 230V yielding ~7.2kW. Because my main circuit breakers are 3 x 25 A which is the standard option for a residential building here in Finland, I purchased a single-phase charger that combines two phases to yield one phase with that 32A at 230V. Now that I have preordered EV6 and I already own a single phase charger I wanted to know if the AC charger of EV6 would be able to charge at 7.2 kW from a single phase.

I put my dealer to ask this from the finnish importer and they said that the charger takes either

3 x 16A at 230V that yields ~11kW charging power

OR

1 x 32A at 230V that yields ~7.2 kW charging power

It is my understanding that a great deal of EVs contains a charger just like this so that they do not need to put different AC chargers for different markets (which is a much more expensive option). Based on this information, I am betting for the option where you would only get something between ~7.2-7.7kW charging power once you have externally arranged a single phase feed with 240V voltage and a maximum of 32A current. I am betting that this is just what the wall charger would do, arrange a single phase feed with 240V voltage and 32A current.

Of course there is a theoretical possibility that Kia did actually choose the hard route and arrange 11 kW home charging possibility also for the people that generally do not get three-phase electricity at home. I would bet against that even though the marketing material says 11kW, which is of course true but just not a realistic possibility for everyone at every possible location. It is also interesting to see if the V2L power actually is 3.6kW like here in Finland or something else, again depending on the grid specs and current limit.

Anyways, I am a bit sceptical if that ~11kW versus ~7.2kW would actually become a true deal breaker in home charging. In practice, it is probably not that often when you arrive home at 0% charge and need to get it to 100% in seven hours, and ten hours with the smaller charging power is absolute no go. If the time really is that crucial to you, you should invest some $20 000 to get a DC charger at home to get rid of the limitations caused by the AC charger.
 

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Just for completeness, I have heard a claim that different phases of the AC charger are not coupled in any way. In another words, the phase difference would then be irrelevant again meaning that it would be somewhat easy to arrange 3 x 16A at 240V feed (no phase difference) to enjoy full AC charging power. Again, a great job for the wall charger.

Please do note that while the former post is based on facts, this is pure speculation. Do not go on and toast your AC charger without an official information confirming / debunking this.
 

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Just for completeness, I have heard a claim that different phases of the AC charger are not coupled in any way. In another words, the phase difference would then be irrelevant again meaning that it would be somewhat easy to arrange 3 x 16A at 240V feed (no phase difference) to enjoy full AC charging power. Again, a great job for the wall charger.

Please do note that while the former post is based on facts, this is pure speculation. Do not go on and toast your AC charger without an official information confirming / debunking this.
Yes but you certainly raise good points to consider. Vehicle shipping delays or timetables actually give me much needed time to get educated and decide. With so many at home options many recommend us to purchase NEMA or UL certified devices. Personally Im a bit paranoid over sealed electrical connections and/or fire risks. Lots to learn
 

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I am currently driving Kia Niro EV containing a single-phase AC charger that takes up to 32A at 230V yielding ~7.2kW. Because my main circuit breakers are 3 x 25 A which is the standard option for a residential building here in Finland, I purchased a single-phase charger that combines two phases to yield one phase with that 32A at 230V. Now that I have preordered EV6 and I already own a single phase charger I wanted to know if the AC charger of EV6 would be able to charge at 7.2 kW from a single phase.

I put my dealer to ask this from the finnish importer and they said that the charger takes either

3 x 16A at 230V that yields ~11kW charging power

OR

1 x 32A at 230V that yields ~7.2 kW charging power

It is my understanding that a great deal of EVs contains a charger just like this so that they do not need to put different AC chargers for different markets (which is a much more expensive option). Based on this information, I am betting for the option where you would only get something between ~7.2-7.7kW charging power once you have externally arranged a single phase feed with 240V voltage and a maximum of 32A current. I am betting that this is just what the wall charger would do, arrange a single phase feed with 240V voltage and 32A current.

Of course there is a theoretical possibility that Kia did actually choose the hard route and arrange 11 kW home charging possibility also for the people that generally do not get three-phase electricity at home. I would bet against that even though the marketing material says 11kW, which is of course true but just not a realistic possibility for everyone at every possible location. It is also interesting to see if the V2L power actually is 3.6kW like here in Finland or something else, again depending on the grid specs and current limit.

Anyways, I am a bit sceptical if that ~11kW versus ~7.2kW would actually become a true deal breaker in home charging. In practice, it is probably not that often when you arrive home at 0% charge and need to get it to 100% in seven hours, and ten hours with the smaller charging power is absolute no go. If the time really is that crucial to you, you should invest some $20 000 to get a DC charger at home to get rid of the limitations caused by the AC charger.
I have the exact same question.
I would hope that SOMEONE that either is with KIA or has access to an actual vehicle manual or real specifications for the US version, can answer this.
 

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Hi, does Kia permit charging inside a garage? I read in a recent artical about a tesla model s that caused a fire in California while charging overnight mentioned that Chevrolet recommended charging outside. Currently we've got a ten year old Nissan leaf that charges outside but if I spent as much to purchase an Ev6 I would like to keep it inside (certainly my wife would! Personally from my experience I think the main advantage to keeping cars indoors is to reduce uv exposure to the polycarbonate components of the headlights which have mostly glazed over on my other vehicles).
I know Hyundai has recently done a recall on some Kona models. I hope Hyundai and Kia have ironed out the creases of the battery cells by now however it remains of concern generally with EVs for me.
 

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I have the exact same question.
I would hope that SOMEONE that either is with KIA or has access to an actual vehicle manual or real specifications for the US version, can answer this.
All, the EV6 comes with the Home Flex from ChargePoint and is capable of delivering up to 50 amps (a 70 amp circuit). That will supply around 11kwh to the vehicle which is it's rating for 240v level 2 charging.

To use this rating, it HAS to be hardwired by code. This charger gives the option of either a NEMA plug or hardwire for higher outputs.

You also need to have the power supply in your home AND the wiring in the circuit to handle it. I have installed 4 gauge wire and an 80 amp circuit in my garage already so that when the EV6 and charger arrive, I can simply mount it, hook it up, and plug it in.
 
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