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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In early July of 2021, I test drove and then put in an order for a Tesla Model Y Long Range. At the time I thought I’d get my car in November or maybe December. Instead, I took delivery of it in mid September of 2022. During that fourteen month wait, I had a chance to buy a Kia EV6 from my local dealer. Given that at the time I had no idea when Tesla might build my car, I test drove the Kia, liked it, and bought it. Now with two EVs in my garage, I have a chance to do my own back to back comparison between an Austin built Tesla Model Y Long Range and a Kia EV6 Wind with the Tech Package and AWD — the winner stays and the other car gets sold.



When I put in my order for the Tesla, there were very few options for electric cars in Illinois with anything close to enough range for me. The Ford Mustang Mach E, Chevy Bolt, and the four Tesla models. Several EV cars from legacy car manufacturers were on the way in coming years and there might have been a few others available, just not in my state at that time. The Bolt didn’t have all wheel drive or very good DC fast charging — later they got recalled for battery fires. The Mustang Mach E has never been particularly appealing to me and dealers were demanding extra charges for them even back then. I considered the Model 3 and Y ruling out the S and X due to price, going with the Y for the hatchback and claimed smoother ride quality.



Through the end of 2021 and first half of 2022, several additional EV options hit the US market, even in Illinois. I immediately liked the Hyundai Ioniq 5, Kia EV6, and Volkswagen ID.4 once they were officially announced. So I made inquiries at local dealerships. It came as a total shock to me when my local Kia dealer called in early February to say that they had a Kia EV6 on the lot with no reservation attached to it. This was at least five months earlier than I expected the Korean EVs to arrive in the midwestern US. I ended up buying it and at the time of this writing I have 13,000 miles on it. I think I have a pretty good sense of what the car is like to own and drive over short and longer distances in all kinds of weather.



My EV6 was my first electric car. Like most EVs, it has remarkable acceleration, a quiet drivetrain, and lots of the common electronic gizmos of modern cars. I think it is an attractive car, sporty looking and contemporary. Mine is a mid level spec for the range, a Wind with the Tech Package and AWD. So it doesn’t have a heads up display, the more advanced semi autonomous driver aids, or sunroof of the top trim model. It also has taller sidewall tires which I genuinely prefer for smoother ride quality. It has a touch screen but also has physical buttons to control various things in the car. From day one I was struck by how quiet and comfortable the car is. It is easily the quietest car I’ve ever owned and among the smoothest in ride quality. Its EV driving characteristics are adjustable and I’ve found a degree regenerative braking that I like. It is well built, designed, and put together. There were no flaws in the paint, bodywork, or trim. There were no squeaks or rattles when new and very few have developed in the past 13,000 miles. At the time it was eligible for the $7500 federal tax incentive making its actual cost to me less than $50,000 total.



I really like my EV6. The ventilated and heated front seats are great. I find that I use the ventilation feature often and on long drives I think it really helps maintain comfort. The layout of the controls is pretty good. I especially like that there is a little shelf below the touchscreen giving my hand a place to brace so that finger touches are more accurate even on a bumpy road. My passengers appreciate that the climate vents front and back are physical things that they can adjust at will. The rear seats are roomy and comfortable with tilting backs. There is plenty of headroom and legroom throughout the car. There are USB-C charging ports in the front and back, an interior 110 volt AC outlet, and a vehicle to load attachment to use the car’s to power port to run appliances, like for camping or in a power outage.



Speaking of power, the car’s 77.4 kWh battery is enough to give it well over 200 miles of interstate highway range or close to 300 miles of lower speed mixed driving. It uses the CCS DC fast charging standard and mine came with 1000 kWh of free charging at Electrify America stations. If you can find the right charger and the battery is at the right temperature, the car can recharge really, really fast. But even at only 150 kWh, my charging stops on road trips are short. However, CCS is a liability at this time where I live and occasionally travel. There just aren’t enough charging stations and most of those that exist can only charge four cars at a time. I’ve also found that Electrify America stations are often not fully operational, with 350 kWh equipment only putting out 125 kWh and some equipment completely non functional. I’m sure this will improve over time, but in 2022 road trips in the midwest can be extra stressful.



On September 13 of 2022 I finally had my appointment to take delivery of my Tesla Model Y. When I got to my nearest service center, I was the only customer there and my car was brought around right away. My inspection of the car found four issues, a chip in the paint, a misaligned front fender, a misaligned door, and taillights that had different gaps on the right and left. The service manager took the car in back to sort these out and I finished my paperwork. It took quite some time to fix the car but it was eventually brought back around for me to finish the set up, phone pairing, etc. But I still couldn’t leave because something went wrong with the servers and my car stayed in service mode which required another long wait while that got sorted. Lest it sound like I’m super unhappy about all of that, this was still a good buying experience and still shorter than any I’d done at a conventional dealership.



Eventually I was able to start my hour and a half trip home. The car was paired to my phone as its key. All the controls were adjusted for me. I had created a driver profile for me and a guest profile too. I’d selected some apps to go in the “dock” area at the bottom of the screen. Saved a couple of radio presets, so time to hit the road. I’d already test driven a Model Y the previous summer, so I knew what to expect with one pedal driving. As soon as I was under way I couldn’t help but notice all the squeaks and rattles coming from the interior of the car. I made my way via surface streets and towards the interstate as the car worked on calibrating its cameras so the various systems like cruise control would start working.



I stopped for lunch and the doors locked on their own when I walked away. That’s a nice touch and I wish my Kia had that feature. Instead I have to either fish out the key fob or firmly press the door handle in just the right way for the doors to lock — which sometimes takes a couple of tries. Unlocking was the same easy matter on the Tesla and again better than my Kia which requires the same routine as locking it. I prefer the Tesla door handles, but both cars are ridiculous. I wish they had something more conventional. Starting the Tesla is really just getting in. My Kia has a start button and start up screen on the dash, which is fine. I’m just pointing out a difference.



Parking and backing up my Model Y for the first time produced some more comparisons. The Tesla has better views looking out the side or front, but the Kia has better views out the back and through the mirrors. That giant Tesla screen only devotes half an inch more to its rear view camera display than the Kia EV6. The Tesla camera resolutions are no better than the various cameras on my Kia and some are worse. For example, the EV6 blind spot side cameras are much better than the Tesla. My Kia has a 360 degree surround view and multiple camera angles to aid parking. Despite its many cameras, Tesla offers less for the driver. A few years ago, Tesla may have had a huge advantage in the market, but they are being overtaken.



Finally on the interstate and pointed home, I tried the cruise control. OK, it makes needless “boing” sounds. The computer simulation display of what’s going on around me is a neat gimmick, though I question it’s usefulness. Later, I engaged the auto steering. Yep, it keeps the car centered in the lane, just like my Kia, but it nags the driver way more. The Kia needs slight steering input less often, especially on the interstate. The Tesla seems to need something every 12 seconds but not too much or it will shut off — it is touchy. The Tesla auto steering doesn’t like construction any more than the Kia and the visualization of the construction cones is amusing.



My drive home was around 60 miles of surface streets in two different cities, interstate between them, and a two lane rural highway for the last leg. On all of these surfaces the Tesla was noticeably louder than my Kia. Bumps hit harder and harsher which set off the various squeaks and rattles coming from all over the interior. Wind, road, and tire noise were louder and of a different character than the EV6, sharper and more echo-like probably because of the glass roof. The decibel measuring app on my phone confirms the Tesla is louder than my EV6. I set up a test later, driving the cars back to back at 60 MPH. The Tesla made 68.8 dB into the wind and 68.7 dB on the return with a tailwind. The Kia made 65.9 into the wind and 65.3 with a tailwind.



I had six incidents on my trip home and several more since then of the cruise control or auto steering on the Tesla misbehaving. The Tesla sometimes insists the speed limit is much lower than actually is. I suspect it is reading road signs and mistaking route markers for speed limits, but no matter the cause it is irritating. The auto steering cancels sometimes for reasons I don’t understand, though I will accept that user error might be playing a role. Then there is the phantom braking… in the first sixty miles it phantom braked three times for no perceptible reason and it has continued to do so nearly every time I drive it. It does this in auto steering and regular cruise control both. It actually seems worse in the day time than at night. Cresting a hill seems to be an aggravating factor. The Kia cruise control and lane centering are better. In 13,000 miles I’ve had one instance of minor misbehavior in my EV6.



A thing about the Tesla cruise control that I like better than the Kia is in stop and go traffic. If the Kia comes to a stop, the driver must push a button or press the accelerator briefly to get the car moving again at which point the cruise takes over. The Tesla just goes when the car in front moves. That’s neat. Another Tesla advantage is that the auto steering and cruise control cancel together. On my EV6, they are separate systems, either one can run alone, and cancelling one does not cancel the other. I prefer the way Tesla does that because there is no circumstance where I want the auto steering without the cruise control.



The automatic high beam headlight control on the Tesla is garbage. It doesn’t want to switch to low beams, even when the oncoming traffic is really close. I had to take manual control every time to avoid blinding people on a two lane rural highway. Then it will switch to low beams for yard lights in houses I pass. I’ve had or driven several cars with automatic high beam controls and all of them work much better than Tesla.



Side by side the Model Y is definitely larger than the Kia EV6. It is taller, longer, and wider. The Kia looks like a car to the Tesla’s SUV proportions. Both have comfortable seats with nice material. The Tesla heats all the seats, even the middle seat in the back. The Kia only heats the front but also ventilates them which is really nice. There is more head room in the Tesla and more room altogether in the back seat. Not that the EV6 is tight, but the Model Y does have more foot and head room in the back and more storage too. There is really no comparison in storage capacity, the Tesla has a big frunk, a big trunk, and a big area under the trunk.



In the Model Y, so many things are in the touch screen. Climate controls including aiming the vents are in the touch screen, so are the windshield wipers, and most everything else. It is a nice screen, clear and responsive. The layout of menus is pretty good, like what one might expect from a good smartphone or tablet computer. The Tesla is very much a computer that you can drive. The Kia EV6 touch screen is much more automotive, functional but not as snazzy. Tesla’s dog mode is such a nice touch. I haven’t used it yet because I’m not letting my puppy in the Tesla unless I sell the Kia.



The smartphone app for Tesla is far better than what the Kia has. It does more. It shows more. It is better designed and most importantly it works. The Kia app has largely not worked for me three of the six months I’ve owned the car. I have a service appointment to replace the modem in the hopes that improves things, but it might be a software issue instead or some kind of issue with the local cellular network. Based on my interactions with Kia over this, I can say they just aren’t a tech company in the way Tesla are.



I think the Tesla Model Y Long Range is faster than the Kia EV6 Wind. I don’t have a good means of testing that to the faction of a second, but by the seat of the pants the Tesla feels quicker. Its steering is quicker and sharper. Overall it has more of a sports car feel. My Model Y also came with the trailer hitch and modes in the software to easily turn off sensors and alarms if there is a bike rack mounted on the hitch. My Kia required an aftermarket hitch and every time it is parked each of the relevant safety systems have to be changed from the touchscreen. It is a pain, but I don’t haul my bike around all that often.



The Tesla seems to be more efficient and over a short test of both cars back to back the Tesla got 3.64 miles/kWh or 275 Wh/mile and the Kia got 3.5 miles/kWh or 286 Wh/mile which is not a huge difference, but enough to give the Model Y more range. I’ve seen averages of 4.1 or more miles/kWh (better than 250 Wh/mile) on the EV6 this summer, but I wanted to quote numbers from identical test drives. Good efficiency coupled with access to the Super Charger network and interior roominess makes the Tesla a better road trip car. There are far more Tesla fast charger stalls in the midwest than everything else combined and Tesla fixes their chargers if they break. There is a stall at an Electrify America station on a route I have used that has been broken down for months.



So which car am I going to keep and which one gets sold? I’m still evaluating, but I’ll probably keep the Kia and sell the Tesla. To be sure the Model Y is a good EV and if I hadn’t had the EV6 first, I’d be satisfied with the Tesla. However, I value a quiet, comfortable ride quality and the Kia is far superior to the Tesla with its sports car ride and noisy interior. I also use cruise control a lot, most every mile I drive. The Tesla cruise control and lane keeping systems are frankly not very good. The Kia systems are good, do what I want them to do, and are trustworthy. I understand that people love the computer-that-you-drive experience of Tesla, but I prefer having real buttons and controls that I can use by feel without looking. Importantly, I can sell the Tesla for more than I paid for it and probably do so easily.



I’ve set the Model Y up with a tempered glass screen protector, all weather floor mats, a removable front plate bracket, under seat rear vent covers, and a mobile charger. Things I had researched long ago and should help keep the car in excellent condition. I’ll drive it a bit but mostly it will remain parked in my garage with the battery at 50-80% until I get around to selling it once I have the title from the state, assuming I sell the Model Y and not the EV6.

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Thanks for your post! Great review and update. I ordered my Tesla Model Y long range in white, black interior and 20 inch wheels & tow hitch in January 2022. In March I had an opportunity to get a EV6 First Edition so I bought it. I planned just like you to get both and evaluate. After driving my EV6 from March to August, Tesla called me to tell me the Tesla was here. I told them I passed and didn't want it. I lost $250 which I paid at the time I ordered. I have several friends with Tesla's; S,3,X,Y all models. Not one of them does not think the Ev6 looks much better than the Y.

They all love the HUD, 360 view, apple car play, auto door handles, ride quality, ventilated seats, V2lL if needed.

The one thing they have that I want is Sentry mode! The super charger network is better, but I just do not drive my EV out of town enough. I have done it once and used EA. Not to mention so many idiots vandalizing Tesla's. So many people are such a holes. I mean seriously!

I will stick with my Kia for now.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your post! Great review and update. I ordered my Tesla Model Y long range in white, black interior and 20 inch wheels & tow hitch in January 2022. In March I had an opportunity to get a EV6 First Edition so I bought it. I planned just like you to get both and evaluate. After driving my EV6 from March to August, Tesla called me to tell me the Tesla was here. I told them I passed and didn't want it. I lost $250 which I paid at the time I ordered. I have several friends with Tesla's; S,3,X,Y all models. Not one of them does not think the Ev6 looks much better than the Y.

They all love the HUD, 360 view, apple car play, auto door handles, ride quality, ventilated seats, V2lL if needed.

The one thing they have that I want is Sentry mode!
Oh yeah I didn't even mention sentry mode or CarPlay, did I? I can see the value of sentry mode, but like dog mode, it is a pretty specific need. CarPlay is also nice to have and I always find it weird when manufacturers omit it.
 

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Wow, I'm surprised that after reading that long post you went with keeping the EV6 over the Tesla. Online the #1 thing I always hear from Tesla drivers is their love for Superchargers and their distain for EA & CCS charging. They always complain about either reliability or how big the CCS connector/cable is. The latter complaint is (in most cases) ridiculous. Most people don't go on road trips every day and the cable isn't that unwieldy.

Me personally, I'd never get a Tesla due to the proprietary nature of their technology - namely their charging port being non-standard and their infotainment system not supporting Android Auto. Before anyone doubts, I have driven a Tesla Model S in 2018 as a Turo rental car on a trip.
 

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I traded my 2021 Model S for a Glacier First Edition. I loved the S but had camera issues if too sunny or too cold. A number of finish issues but loved the tec and dog mode 😊. I have wish list for Kia but am very happy I made the upgrade to the EV 6. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow, I'm surprised that after reading that long post you went with keeping the EV6 over the Tesla. Online the #1 thing I always hear from Tesla drivers is their love for Superchargers and their distain for EA & CCS charging. They always complain about either reliability or how big the CCS connector/cable is. The latter complaint is (in most cases) ridiculous. Most people don't go on road trips every day and the cable isn't that unwieldy.

Me personally, I'd never get a Tesla due to the proprietary nature of their technology - namely their charging port being non-standard and their infotainment system not supporting Android Auto. Before anyone doubts, I have driven a Tesla Model S in 2018 as a Turo rental car on a trip.
Well I’m not really a Tesla guy. I’ve had an EV6 for six months and a Tesla for four days. I’m disappointed that most everything I had heard about Tesla being substandard ended up being true. The phantom braking was especially upsetting. I could maybe live with it being noisy and harsh but I insist on a functional and trustworthy cruise control.

I am envious of the super charger network. But I don’t road trip enough for that to be a top tier consideration.
 

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Wow, I'm surprised that after reading that long post you went with keeping the EV6 over the Tesla. Online the #1 thing I always hear from Tesla drivers is their love for Superchargers and their distain for EA & CCS charging. They always complain about either reliability or how big the CCS connector/cable is. The latter complaint is (in most cases) ridiculous. Most people don't go on road trips every day and the cable isn't that unwieldy.

Me personally, I'd never get a Tesla due to the proprietary nature of their technology - namely their charging port being non-standard and their infotainment system not supporting Android Auto. Before anyone doubts, I have driven a Tesla Model S in 2018 as a Turo rental car on a trip.
The Tesla can use both CCS and their own Supercharger network. The Tesla network is 100x better than the EA network. I'm not exaggerating.
 

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Well I’m not really a Tesla guy. I’ve had an EV6 for six months and a Tesla for four days. I’m disappointed that most everything I had heard about Tesla being substandard ended up being true. The phantom braking was especially upsetting. I could maybe live with it being noisy and harsh but I insist on a functional and trustworthy cruise control.

I am envious of the super charger network. But I don’t road trip enough for that to be a top tier consideration.
What software are you on? Sadly, the cars typically ship with older software and the phantom braking is more prevalent prior to the 10.69 update. Unfortunately, the first update takes a month or two after you get the new car. Try to drive it a bit and see how autopilot works for you after the update.
 

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The Tesla can use both CCS and their own Supercharger network. The Tesla network is 100x better than the EA network. I'm not exaggerating.
I don't dispute that Tesla's network is more widespread and reliable. What I do dispute is other people's complaints of the CCS connector/cable (elsewhere on the internet, not on this thread). I also don't like the proprietary nature of the Tesla connector. But I have no issues with the other aspects of the Supercharger network.
 

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I don't dispute that Tesla's network is more widespread and reliable. What I do dispute is other people's complaints of the CCS connector/cable (elsewhere on the internet, not on this thread). I also don't like the proprietary nature of the Tesla connector. But I have no issues with the other aspects of the Supercharger network.
If you have a Tesla, you can just use their CCS adapter to use the EA network. There is no disadvantage for Tesla having their own connector in the US. The proprietary nature doesn't impact Tesla at all. Ironically, they use CCS as their standard plug in Europe so I think they are ambivalent to keeping their standard. Its just too expensive to change all of their networks to CCS so they continue using their proprietary chargers.
 

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There is no disadvantage for Tesla having their own connector in the US. The proprietary nature doesn't impact Tesla at all.
Yeah I know that. I just don't like their proprietary connector based on principle. Similarly, I will never use an iPhone as my primary device until they switch to USB-C. I don't like proprietary systems. An even bigger issue to me is no Android Auto in Teslas and their high prices.
 

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Yeah I know that. I just don't like their proprietary connector based on principle. Similarly, I will never use an iPhone as my primary device until they switch to USB-C. I don't like proprietary systems. An even bigger issue to me is no Android Auto in Teslas and their high prices.
Well...they predate the CCS connector so can't really blame them for sticking with their own stuff when they rolled out thousands of chargers before anyone else. Ironically, you can argue they are the standard as there are far more Teslas on the street than all other EVs combined :LOL:

Of course, it may not matter if Tesla just opens up their network.
 

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I agree that those Teslas might be on an older software, cause the Y and 3 I drove had better autopilot than my EV6 by far especially around curves. I don't trust my EV6 around curves at all, and I'm not talking huge curves here. However, the EV6 is just a smoother and way quieter ride for my family then both the Y and 3, I just wish it had oomph on the freeway like the Teslas. Don't try to muscle a Tesla on the freeway cause you will get smoked.
 

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I agree that those Teslas might be on an older software, cause the Y and 3 I drove had better autopilot than my EV6 by far especially around curves. I don't trust my EV6 around curves at all, and I'm not talking huge curves here. However, the EV6 is just a smoother and way quieter ride for my family then both the Y and 3, I just wish it had oomph on the freeway like the Teslas. Don't try to muscle a Tesla on the freeway cause you will get smoked.
I drive both cars quite a bit and i feel the autopilot is much better. I don't get much phantom braking either but I hear its region dependent meaning that Tesla has a lot of data in California so it tends to do better than places with less Teslas. I don't really compare the EV6 with the Model 3 as the Model 3 is much more of a sports sedan than a family crossover. The EV6 is a much better family vehicle for sure.
 

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Well I’m not really a Tesla guy. I’ve had an EV6 for six months and a Tesla for four days. I’m disappointed that most everything I had heard about Tesla being substandard ended up being true. The phantom braking was especially upsetting. I could maybe live with it being noisy and harsh but I insist on a functional and trustworthy cruise control.

I am envious of the super charger network. But I don’t road trip enough for that to be a top tier consideration.
This made me laugh

‘but I insist on a functional and trustworthy cruise control’ Absolutely !!
 

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Tesla had to build the standard because when they start building cars there was only CHAdeMO and that standard was dying. But the conditions to use the Tesla standard were pretty harsh. They explain it very well in this article.


I used both EA and ChargePoint successfully so far and there are other networks available. The only downside is another app and account that needs to be opened. In my area ChargePoint has way more stations than EA.
 

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I have been driving Tesla's for years, and have FSD. There is absolutely no comparison -- the FSD is immeasurably better than HDA2. The latter does a poor job at staying in the lane around curves, disengages without warning, and is cumbersome to engage -- a couple of steps instead of simply tapping the stalk. Additionally, the traffic light recognition and behavior of the Tesla is fantastic, and if you are driving through intersections or going through complex interchanges on interstates, the car just navigates through this, usually perfectly, when Navigate on Auto Pilot is activated. I have around 80K miles and also have never seen it go through a red light. So overall, there are of course issues with Tesla's FSD if you are navigating through busy city streets. And I keep my hands on the wheel in the city. But it is the one reason I keep my Tesla.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
What software are you on? Sadly, the cars typically ship with older software and the phantom braking is more prevalent prior to the 10.69 update. Unfortunately, the first update takes a month or two after you get the new car. Try to drive it a bit and see how autopilot works for you after the update.
My Model Y has up to date software. It is running 2022.23.101.1
 
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