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Thank you for posting your review. Definitely helpful. EV6 is my first electric car and I'm happy with it. Tesla does have some pretty cool bells and whistles, but I'm with what I have.

By the way, what's "Dog Mode"?
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thank you for posting your review. Definitely helpful. EV6 is my first electric car and I'm happy with it. Tesla does have some pretty cool bells and whistles, but I'm with what I have.

By the way, what's "Dog Mode"?
It is a Tesla feature that allows the car to be locked and turned off except for the climate system which stays on to keep pets safe and comfortable in the car alone.
 

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Very nice write up! I am very likely to pick up a Model Y performance in a few month, household needs a 2nd car in addition to our EV6 GT-Line AWD which we very much enjoyed. Personally owned a Model 3 LR for couple years before selling it.

I would be curious of the responses you get if you post the same review to Tesla Motor Club forum.
 

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Quite a lot of interesting and and informative information. My daughter bought a Model Y in the early fall of 2019, and I an EV6 Wind AWD with technology package and Homelink® mirror pop in May. Price wise, hers was $55,000 with no tax credit (white interior, enhanced autopilot), the current MSRP for a Model Y equipped as hers is over $70,000, while mine was about $54,500 except with a $7500 tax credit. The Tesla seems to have a lot more effective cargo capacity while the Kia has both a more refined chassis and is not as "user hostile" as the Tesla. Performance wise the cars are very much alike.

I find the Kia to be an easier transition than the Tesla, but there's no denying the Supercharging network, extra capacity, and higher price despite now having a tax credit advantage.
 

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…HDA2. The latter does a poor job at staying in the lane around curves, disengages without warning, and is cumbersome to engage -- a couple of steps instead of simply tapping the stalk.
If you’re talking about the EV6’s HDA2, we must be driving very different cars. Mine activates with a single push of a button on the steering wheel, no need to move my hand to a stalk. Simply get to the speed I want and touch the button. It stays in the lane around curves and has never disengaged without me pushing one of 2 buttons or touching the brake pedal.

It also works great in traffic, slowing to a stop and automatically starting back up when the car in front moves away. Honestly, it did take a bit of getting used to HDA2 in traffic, because I always wanted to slow earlier. Changing the radar distance has helped.

I had Chevy’s version of “adaptive cruise control” in my 2017 Volt. It was way better than the same in my wife’s 2017 RAV4. But both are light years behind the EV6 and it’s likely years behind FSD.

If I’ve misread or misunderstood what you are saying, I apologize. And what you experience is definitely yours to experience.
 

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Thank you for posting your review. Definitely helpful. EV6 is my first electric car and I'm happy with it. Tesla does have some pretty cool bells and whistles, but I'm with what I have.

By the way, what's "Dog Mode"?
I did a makeshift Dog Mode in the EV6 - run the car in Utility Mode with the A/C running and use both a custom windshield and custom front door window sunshades to reduce heat and to block passer-bys from seeing the instrument cluster (can’t turn the screens off in Utility Mode).


Good thing the EV6 has a quiet A/C compressor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I did a makeshift Dog Mode in the EV6 - run the car in Utility Mode with the A/C running and use both a custom windshield and custom front door window sunshades to reduce heat and to block passer-bys from seeing the instrument cluster (can’t turn the screens off in Utility Mode).


Good thing the EV6 has a quiet A/C compressor.
Can Utility Mode be run with the car locked and the key outside the car? For some reason I thought it had to have the key inside.
 

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Online the #1 thing I always hear from Tesla drivers is their love for Superchargers and their distain for EA & CCS charging. They always complain about either reliability or how big the CCS connector/cable is. The latter complaint is (in most cases) ridiculous. Most people don't go on road trips every day and the cable isn't that unwieldy.
LOL apparently at least one Tesla owner doesn't have a disdain for EA and/or CCS--just yesterday I saw a Tesla plugged in at an EA station...probably taking advantage of the complimentary EA charging that's been available for over a week now.
 

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Can Utility Mode be run with the car locked and the key outside the car? For some reason I thought it had to have the key inside.
Yes but it’s requires a dance.

Run Utility Mode. Lock all doors while inside the vehicle. Open only the driver’s door. Exit the car and lock the driver’s door with the mechanical key.

This would be much simpler if Kia allowed us to lock the doors with the power door lock switch while the driver’s door is open or if we can lock all doors with the key in the hole but c’est la vie.
 

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In early July of 2021, I test drove and then put in an order for a Tesla Model Y Long Range. At the time I thought I’d get my car in November or maybe December. Instead, I took delivery of it in mid September of 2022. During that fourteen month wait, I had a chance to buy a Kia EV6 from my local dealer. Given that at the time I had no idea when Tesla might build my car, I test drove the Kia, liked it, and bought it. Now with two EVs in my garage, I have a chance to do my own back to back comparison between an Austin built Tesla Model Y Long Range and a Kia EV6 Wind with the Tech Package and AWD — the winner stays and the other car gets sold.



When I put in my order for the Tesla, there were very few options for electric cars in Illinois with anything close to enough range for me. The Ford Mustang Mach E, Chevy Bolt, and the four Tesla models. Several EV cars from legacy car manufacturers were on the way in coming years and there might have been a few others available, just not in my state at that time. The Bolt didn’t have all wheel drive or very good DC fast charging — later they got recalled for battery fires. The Mustang Mach E has never been particularly appealing to me and dealers were demanding extra charges for them even back then. I considered the Model 3 and Y ruling out the S and X due to price, going with the Y for the hatchback and claimed smoother ride quality.



Through the end of 2021 and first half of 2022, several additional EV options hit the US market, even in Illinois. I immediately liked the Hyundai Ioniq 5, Kia EV6, and Volkswagen ID.4 once they were officially announced. So I made inquiries at local dealerships. It came as a total shock to me when my local Kia dealer called in early February to say that they had a Kia EV6 on the lot with no reservation attached to it. This was at least five months earlier than I expected the Korean EVs to arrive in the midwestern US. I ended up buying it and at the time of this writing I have 13,000 miles on it. I think I have a pretty good sense of what the car is like to own and drive over short and longer distances in all kinds of weather.



My EV6 was my first electric car. Like most EVs, it has remarkable acceleration, a quiet drivetrain, and lots of the common electronic gizmos of modern cars. I think it is an attractive car, sporty looking and contemporary. Mine is a mid level spec for the range, a Wind with the Tech Package and AWD. So it doesn’t have a heads up display, the more advanced semi autonomous driver aids, or sunroof of the top trim model. It also has taller sidewall tires which I genuinely prefer for smoother ride quality. It has a touch screen but also has physical buttons to control various things in the car. From day one I was struck by how quiet and comfortable the car is. It is easily the quietest car I’ve ever owned and among the smoothest in ride quality. Its EV driving characteristics are adjustable and I’ve found a degree regenerative braking that I like. It is well built, designed, and put together. There were no flaws in the paint, bodywork, or trim. There were no squeaks or rattles when new and very few have developed in the past 13,000 miles. At the time it was eligible for the $7500 federal tax incentive making its actual cost to me less than $50,000 total.



I really like my EV6. The ventilated and heated front seats are great. I find that I use the ventilation feature often and on long drives I think it really helps maintain comfort. The layout of the controls is pretty good. I especially like that there is a little shelf below the touchscreen giving my hand a place to brace so that finger touches are more accurate even on a bumpy road. My passengers appreciate that the climate vents front and back are physical things that they can adjust at will. The rear seats are roomy and comfortable with tilting backs. There is plenty of headroom and legroom throughout the car. There are USB-C charging ports in the front and back, an interior 110 volt AC outlet, and a vehicle to load attachment to use the car’s to power port to run appliances, like for camping or in a power outage.



Speaking of power, the car’s 77.4 kWh battery is enough to give it well over 200 miles of interstate highway range or close to 300 miles of lower speed mixed driving. It uses the CCS DC fast charging standard and mine came with 1000 kWh of free charging at Electrify America stations. If you can find the right charger and the battery is at the right temperature, the car can recharge really, really fast. But even at only 150 kWh, my charging stops on road trips are short. However, CCS is a liability at this time where I live and occasionally travel. There just aren’t enough charging stations and most of those that exist can only charge four cars at a time. I’ve also found that Electrify America stations are often not fully operational, with 350 kWh equipment only putting out 125 kWh and some equipment completely non functional. I’m sure this will improve over time, but in 2022 road trips in the midwest can be extra stressful.



On September 13 of 2022 I finally had my appointment to take delivery of my Tesla Model Y. When I got to my nearest service center, I was the only customer there and my car was brought around right away. My inspection of the car found four issues, a chip in the paint, a misaligned front fender, a misaligned door, and taillights that had different gaps on the right and left. The service manager took the car in back to sort these out and I finished my paperwork. It took quite some time to fix the car but it was eventually brought back around for me to finish the set up, phone pairing, etc. But I still couldn’t leave because something went wrong with the servers and my car stayed in service mode which required another long wait while that got sorted. Lest it sound like I’m super unhappy about all of that, this was still a good buying experience and still shorter than any I’d done at a conventional dealership.



Eventually I was able to start my hour and a half trip home. The car was paired to my phone as its key. All the controls were adjusted for me. I had created a driver profile for me and a guest profile too. I’d selected some apps to go in the “dock” area at the bottom of the screen. Saved a couple of radio presets, so time to hit the road. I’d already test driven a Model Y the previous summer, so I knew what to expect with one pedal driving. As soon as I was under way I couldn’t help but notice all the squeaks and rattles coming from the interior of the car. I made my way via surface streets and towards the interstate as the car worked on calibrating its cameras so the various systems like cruise control would start working.



I stopped for lunch and the doors locked on their own when I walked away. That’s a nice touch and I wish my Kia had that feature. Instead I have to either fish out the key fob or firmly press the door handle in just the right way for the doors to lock — which sometimes takes a couple of tries. Unlocking was the same easy matter on the Tesla and again better than my Kia which requires the same routine as locking it. I prefer the Tesla door handles, but both cars are ridiculous. I wish they had something more conventional. Starting the Tesla is really just getting in. My Kia has a start button and start up screen on the dash, which is fine. I’m just pointing out a difference.



Parking and backing up my Model Y for the first time produced some more comparisons. The Tesla has better views looking out the side or front, but the Kia has better views out the back and through the mirrors. That giant Tesla screen only devotes half an inch more to its rear view camera display than the Kia EV6. The Tesla camera resolutions are no better than the various cameras on my Kia and some are worse. For example, the EV6 blind spot side cameras are much better than the Tesla. My Kia has a 360 degree surround view and multiple camera angles to aid parking. Despite its many cameras, Tesla offers less for the driver. A few years ago, Tesla may have had a huge advantage in the market, but they are being overtaken.



Finally on the interstate and pointed home, I tried the cruise control. OK, it makes needless “boing” sounds. The computer simulation display of what’s going on around me is a neat gimmick, though I question it’s usefulness. Later, I engaged the auto steering. Yep, it keeps the car centered in the lane, just like my Kia, but it nags the driver way more. The Kia needs slight steering input less often, especially on the interstate. The Tesla seems to need something every 12 seconds but not too much or it will shut off — it is touchy. The Tesla auto steering doesn’t like construction any more than the Kia and the visualization of the construction cones is amusing.



My drive home was around 60 miles of surface streets in two different cities, interstate between them, and a two lane rural highway for the last leg. On all of these surfaces the Tesla was noticeably louder than my Kia. Bumps hit harder and harsher which set off the various squeaks and rattles coming from all over the interior. Wind, road, and tire noise were louder and of a different character than the EV6, sharper and more echo-like probably because of the glass roof. The decibel measuring app on my phone confirms the Tesla is louder than my EV6. I set up a test later, driving the cars back to back at 60 MPH. The Tesla made 68.8 dB into the wind and 68.7 dB on the return with a tailwind. The Kia made 65.9 into the wind and 65.3 with a tailwind.



I had six incidents on my trip home and several more since then of the cruise control or auto steering on the Tesla misbehaving. The Tesla sometimes insists the speed limit is much lower than actually is. I suspect it is reading road signs and mistaking route markers for speed limits, but no matter the cause it is irritating. The auto steering cancels sometimes for reasons I don’t understand, though I will accept that user error might be playing a role. Then there is the phantom braking… in the first sixty miles it phantom braked three times for no perceptible reason and it has continued to do so nearly every time I drive it. It does this in auto steering and regular cruise control both. It actually seems worse in the day time than at night. Cresting a hill seems to be an aggravating factor. The Kia cruise control and lane centering are better. In 13,000 miles I’ve had one instance of minor misbehavior in my EV6.



A thing about the Tesla cruise control that I like better than the Kia is in stop and go traffic. If the Kia comes to a stop, the driver must push a button or press the accelerator briefly to get the car moving again at which point the cruise takes over. The Tesla just goes when the car in front moves. That’s neat. Another Tesla advantage is that the auto steering and cruise control cancel together. On my EV6, they are separate systems, either one can run alone, and cancelling one does not cancel the other. I prefer the way Tesla does that because there is no circumstance where I want the auto steering without the cruise control.



The automatic high beam headlight control on the Tesla is garbage. It doesn’t want to switch to low beams, even when the oncoming traffic is really close. I had to take manual control every time to avoid blinding people on a two lane rural highway. Then it will switch to low beams for yard lights in houses I pass. I’ve had or driven several cars with automatic high beam controls and all of them work much better than Tesla.



Side by side the Model Y is definitely larger than the Kia EV6. It is taller, longer, and wider. The Kia looks like a car to the Tesla’s SUV proportions. Both have comfortable seats with nice material. The Tesla heats all the seats, even the middle seat in the back. The Kia only heats the front but also ventilates them which is really nice. There is more head room in the Tesla and more room altogether in the back seat. Not that the EV6 is tight, but the Model Y does have more foot and head room in the back and more storage too. There is really no comparison in storage capacity, the Tesla has a big frunk, a big trunk, and a big area under the trunk.



In the Model Y, so many things are in the touch screen. Climate controls including aiming the vents are in the touch screen, so are the windshield wipers, and most everything else. It is a nice screen, clear and responsive. The layout of menus is pretty good, like what one might expect from a good smartphone or tablet computer. The Tesla is very much a computer that you can drive. The Kia EV6 touch screen is much more automotive, functional but not as snazzy. Tesla’s dog mode is such a nice touch. I haven’t used it yet because I’m not letting my puppy in the Tesla unless I sell the Kia.



The smartphone app for Tesla is far better than what the Kia has. It does more. It shows more. It is better designed and most importantly it works. The Kia app has largely not worked for me three of the six months I’ve owned the car. I have a service appointment to replace the modem in the hopes that improves things, but it might be a software issue instead or some kind of issue with the local cellular network. Based on my interactions with Kia over this, I can say they just aren’t a tech company in the way Tesla are.



I think the Tesla Model Y Long Range is faster than the Kia EV6 Wind. I don’t have a good means of testing that to the faction of a second, but by the seat of the pants the Tesla feels quicker. Its steering is quicker and sharper. Overall it has more of a sports car feel. My Model Y also came with the trailer hitch and modes in the software to easily turn off sensors and alarms if there is a bike rack mounted on the hitch. My Kia required an aftermarket hitch and every time it is parked each of the relevant safety systems have to be changed from the touchscreen. It is a pain, but I don’t haul my bike around all that often.



The Tesla seems to be more efficient and over a short test of both cars back to back the Tesla got 3.64 miles/kWh or 275 Wh/mile and the Kia got 3.5 miles/kWh or 286 Wh/mile which is not a huge difference, but enough to give the Model Y more range. I’ve seen averages of 4.1 or more miles/kWh (better than 250 Wh/mile) on the EV6 this summer, but I wanted to quote numbers from identical test drives. Good efficiency coupled with access to the Super Charger network and interior roominess makes the Tesla a better road trip car. There are far more Tesla fast charger stalls in the midwest than everything else combined and Tesla fixes their chargers if they break. There is a stall at an Electrify America station on a route I have used that has been broken down for months.



So which car am I going to keep and which one gets sold? I’m still evaluating, but I’ll probably keep the Kia and sell the Tesla. To be sure the Model Y is a good EV and if I hadn’t had the EV6 first, I’d be satisfied with the Tesla. However, I value a quiet, comfortable ride quality and the Kia is far superior to the Tesla with its sports car ride and noisy interior. I also use cruise control a lot, most every mile I drive. The Tesla cruise control and lane keeping systems are frankly not very good. The Kia systems are good, do what I want them to do, and are trustworthy. I understand that people love the computer-that-you-drive experience of Tesla, but I prefer having real buttons and controls that I can use by feel without looking. Importantly, I can sell the Tesla for more than I paid for it and probably do so easily.



I’ve set the Model Y up with a tempered glass screen protector, all weather floor mats, a removable front plate bracket, under seat rear vent covers, and a mobile charger. Things I had researched long ago and should help keep the car in excellent condition. I’ll drive it a bit but mostly it will remain parked in my garage with the battery at 50-80% until I get around to selling it once I have the title from the state, assuming I sell the Model Y and not the EV6.

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Terrific review. Thank you for taking the time to write since I am sure it took time away from other duties
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
LOL apparently at least one Tesla owner doesn't have a disdain for EA and/or CCS--just yesterday I saw a Tesla plugged in at an EA station...probably taking advantage of the complimentary EA charging that's been available for over a week now.
I saw that on Labor Day weekend, it was a Canadian Model 3 with folks clearly on a road trip. I also saw a Rivian pickup, multiple Audi crossover thingies, VW iD4s, a couple of Mach E, another EV6, and a few Chevy Bolts. Most everyone was friendly and chatted a bit. We kind of had to since both of the EA stations I used that weekend (coming and going) had broken chargers and we had to take turns with the plugs that worked.
 

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In the short time I been in a Model Y's front passenger seat, the foot well seems cramped, it feels like the floor pan had to be shifted back to make way for the front motor and the frunk, felt like I'm stepping on a steep piece of plywood, didn't have that issue with the EV6.

Also if I lean forward, I'll hit my head on the visor on the model Y, but if I shifted the seat all the way back so I don't get the footwell and head smashing issue, the rear passenger's leg room is gone.
 

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Fantastic review & comparison of the 2 cars, very many thanks for taking the time to write it. Your thoughts align very much with my own & are the reasons why I cancelled my MY order even though it would have turned up earlier than the EV6 that I'm still waiting for. For me, 2 things stood out - the dreadful ordering process to buy a MY in the UK which is prevalent throughout the whole Tesla experience and, secondly, the fact that my Better Half would have really hated the car's UI and its central screen.
 

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If you’re talking about the EV6’s HDA2, we must be driving very different cars. Mine activates with a single push of a button on the steering wheel, no need to move my hand to a stalk. Simply get to the speed I want and touch the button. It stays in the lane around curves and has never disengaged without me pushing one of 2 buttons or touching the brake pedal.

It also works great in traffic, slowing to a stop and automatically starting back up when the car in front moves away. Honestly, it did take a bit of getting used to HDA2 in traffic, because I always wanted to slow earlier. Changing the radar distance has helped.

I had Chevy’s version of “adaptive cruise control” in my 2017 Volt. It was way better than the same in my wife’s 2017 RAV4. But both are light years behind the EV6 and it’s likely years behind FSD.

If I’ve misread or misunderstood what you are saying, I apologize. And what you experience is definitely yours to experience.
Hi, about the HDA2. The OP said you have to manually get it moving again when it comes to a stop behind another car in traffic. You are saying the opposite. Just want to make sure. When in traffic and the car in front of you stops, the EV6 will automatically start moving again when the car in front of you moves?

Thanks!
 

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Hi, about the HDA2. The OP said you have to manually get it moving again when it comes to a stop behind another car in traffic. You are saying the opposite. Just want to make sure. When in traffic and the car in front of you stops, the EV6 will automatically start moving again when the car in front of you moves?

Thanks!
It depends on the road you’re on. It will if HDA is enabled (i.e. on the highway) but will not if you’re on city or rural roads.
 

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Hi, about the HDA2. The OP said you have to manually get it moving again when it comes to a stop behind another car in traffic. You are saying the opposite. Just want to make sure. When in traffic and the car in front of you stops, the EV6 will automatically start moving again when the car in front of you moves?

Thanks!
Yes, absolutely on limited-access roads, I rarely touch either pedal once set. Therefore, @KiaevCan, is also correct and the roads he’s talking about are not HDA compatible and HDA would not be engaged, resulting in simple cruise control, or at best, adaptive cruise control without stop-and-go ability.

In general, HDA2 adds steering and lane change assistance, again, only on limited-access highways. And, as many of us have found, these 2 features can be finicky depending on the lane markings. I find that with just the dots and no painted lane markings, lane change assist frequently fails.

Steering assistance and stop-n-go works well for me. IIRC, steering assistance requires a route set in the onboard Kia navigation. Steering assistance on higher speed curves, such as transitions between highways, can be as exciting as a roller coaster. LOL Sometimes the radar sees the road differently and doesn’t slow appropriately, so be ready. And YMMV.

Yes, the manual tries to explain all this, but I found an attempt to explain HDA specific to HMC (Hyundai Motor Corp) vehicles, J.D. Power says this:
“Highway Driving Assist is a Level 2 advanced driving assistance system (ADAS) designed for limited-access highways. It combines adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go capability, leading vehicle distance maintenance technology, a lane-centering assistance system, GPS data, and route information from the navigation system to reduce driver stress and fatigue.” See the entire piece here.
 
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