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Just got my EV6 Wind AWD. KIA advertise the EV6 able to be charged by 800V DC. Anyone has found those charger. Is that the Electricfy 350Kwh? I used one 150kwh on Electricfy America. It took 30 min to charge 22kwh from 74% to 98%. Is that good?
 

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Any charge about 80% will be much slower as the power slows down to protect the battery (same thing in AC charging at home). That time seems reasonable given your starting and ending SOC.

Yes, the EA 350kW chargers are 800V. The 150kW might be too since I think it’s sharing the wiring with the 350kW station.
 

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I found the EA 350 kW chargers to not be so great when I drove the car home. They generally ran from 55-77 kW, even at a set of four chargers with no other car there than mine. One started at 196 kW, telling me 14 minutes to 80% (started at ~15%), but quickly dropped and by 40% it was down in the 50s and telling me 24 minutes until 80%. I bailed on it and went further down the road where there were more restaurants. Oddly the 150 kW station there ran as fast or faster than the two 350 kW chargers I had used earlier that day, it was averaging ~77 kW.
 

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There are many factors that affect charging speed/power. The ambient temperature affects the EVSE (EA unit), battery temperature, where you are charging on the charging curve, amperage/voltage of the EA unit and amount of charging losses to name a few factors. It seems a major factor in the e-GMP platform is the battery temp and the lack of battery pre-heating prior to charging. See Bjorn Nyland's video on this, Kia EV6 and Hyundai Ioniq 5 battery overheating explained.

Hyundai is set to release a software update that will allow this function, and perhaps on-demand pre-heating, for mapped routes to an EVSE. Kyle Connor of Out of Spec Reviews mentions in this video (27:20) that en-route pre-heating/pre-conditioning of the battery is coming soon, Volkswagen ID.4 EV Road Trip To Buy A Hyundai IONIQ 5! because he has a call with the Hyundai engineers during the video. Perhaps the newly announced software upgrade rolling out has these features.
 

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There are many factors that affect charging speed/power. The ambient temperature affects the EVSE (EA unit), battery temperature, where you are charging on the charging curve, amperage/voltage of the EA unit and amount of charging losses to name a few factors. It seems a major factor in the e-GMP platform is the battery temp and the lack of battery pre-heating prior to charging. See Bjorn Nyland's video on this, Kia EV6 and Hyundai Ioniq 5 battery overheating explained.

Hyundai is set to release a software update that will allow this function, and perhaps on-demand pre-heating, for mapped routes to an EVSE. Kyle Connor of Out of Spec Reviews mentions in this video (27:20) that en-route pre-heating/pre-conditioning of the battery is coming soon, Volkswagen ID.4 EV Road Trip To Buy A Hyundai IONIQ 5! because he has a call with the Hyundai engineers during the video. Perhaps the newly announced software upgrade rolling out has these features.
Since the Hyundai and the Kia are running on the same platform that should make it to the Kia soon too.
 

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2022 EV6 GT-Line AWD Aurora Black Pearl
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Just got my EV6 Wind AWD. KIA advertise the EV6 able to be charged by 800V DC. Anyone has found those charger. Is that the Electricfy 350Kwh? I used one 150kwh on Electricfy America. It took 30 min to charge 22kwh from 74% to 98%. Is that good?
Given where you bought your EV6, if you're local, I'll guess that the 150 KW charger you're referring to is the site by TJ Max? While your charging rate was very low, that wasn't because of the charger. I use those chargers, and, given enough time for the battery to warm up, I've been charging close to the rated 150 KW. Those chargers are OK.

If you're in Westchester, the nearest 350 KW chargers aren't all that close. The closest is in Stamford, CT. It's not worth driving there from here since the 150s are reasonably fast.

Unless you're driving like a maniac to heat up the battery (which you won't be doing near these chargers), the initial charging rate will be slow, but it should speed up in about 15 minutes or so. Then the rate hovers close to 140 or so, until you reach 80% SOC. At that point the car starts lowering the rat to protect the battery.

I usually charge the car from around 40% up to 80%. It takes maybe half an hour. I should really let it get down to about 20% because that extra 20% should happen at a high rate since the battery's already warm.
 

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I found the EA 350 kW chargers to not be so great when I drove the car home. They generally ran from 55-77 kW, even at a set of four chargers with no other car there than mine. One started at 196 kW, telling me 14 minutes to 80% (started at ~15%), but quickly dropped and by 40% it was down in the 50s and telling me 24 minutes until 80%. I bailed on it and went further down the road where there were more restaurants. Oddly the 150 kW station there ran as fast or faster than the two 350 kW chargers I had used earlier that day, it was averaging ~77 kW.
I was wondering about that when I read this article in Green Car News about 350kw vs 150kw charging. It seems to be an anecdotal conclusion; would be nice to get more extensive data about whether it's typical that 350kw chargers are faster as we'd expect, or not. I have not used DC charging on my EV6 yet but am thinking about some road trips where I'd need to.
 

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If you want full speed or close to it, you need to use the 350kW chargers and your state of charge need to be at least lower than 50%. As the battery gets fuller, the rate needs to slow down to prevent damage to the main battery. I believe the EV6 maxes out at 250kW, so you can't reach that rate using a 150kW charger.
Maybe Electrify America chargers just suck.

Also see this thread:
 

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I recently had the unfortunate luck of plugging into an EA 350 kW charger that ultimately delivered a max charging speed of 170 kW; SOC at start of charge was 14%. Oddly enough(?), even at that speed the total charging time from 14% to 78% (51 kWh delivered) was 18 minutes 41 seconds.

For comparison, at an EA 150 kW charger the max charging speed for the session was 138 kW, total charging time to go from 19% to 80% (50 kWh delivered) was 23 minutes 38 seconds.
 

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If we do the math, to go from 10% to 80% charge in a 77.4kwh battery equals 54kwh. To do that in 18 minutes would take about 175kw average of charging consistantly over that time. I haven’t watched the charge rates on mine since I've only used public charging 3 times and was away from the car but I'm sure the highest rate of charge would be over the middle 40% of the battery capacity. There is a lot of communication going on between the car and the charging station to control this that we don't see all due to battery design, battery soc, charger capability and environmental conditions. You can't really expect to see exactly the same charge times even using the same rate charger from just one company, let alone different chargers.
 

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I was wondering about that when I read this article in Green Car News about 350kw vs 150kw charging. It seems to be an anecdotal conclusion; would be nice to get more extensive data about whether it's typical that 350kw chargers are faster as we'd expect, or not. I have not used DC charging on my EV6 yet but am thinking about some road trips where I'd need to.
Saw this on reddit:

Almost all EA 150 stalls are actually 175 kW units, so I generally use the 150s because it only adds like 2 minutes and the car stays quieter because it doesn't have to work cooling quite as hard.
That would make sense for seeing 173 kW reported on those "150 kW" chargers.
 
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