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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Earlier today I posted a photo of charging my 12 volt under the hood battery. We picked up our FE 3 days earlier. the car had little to no activity for probably 8 weeks.
After driving 50 miles and giving it a 100% high voltage battery charge overnight, I decided to look under the hood.
The 12 volt battery came it at 12.6 volts. I performed a 30 amp charge boost (this is a regular flooded lead acid battery) and then completed to a full charge at normal speeds for my charger.
I am posting 2 photos, this first of how to safely connect a charger or jumper cables and the second is the photo showing the voltage of a fully charged battery. Hope this info helps some folks.
Hood Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Trunk Gas
Motor vehicle Electrical wiring Electricity Electronic device Machine
Motor vehicle Electrical wiring Electricity Electronic device Machine
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A battery tender is not nearly as powerful as the charger I used and may only maintain current voltage, not charge to 100 percent in a few hours. Battery tender is for long periods of inactivity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wouldn't placing it on a battery tender serve the same purpose?
Battery chargers come in all different power levels. My charger can provide a 100 amp starting boost to a dead car replacing a jumper cable. It can also provide a quick 30 amp boost in few minutes and it also charges the vehicle rapidly with I believe 10 amps. Amps x volts = watts. Decide how much you want to spend, what batteries you will be working on and then get a charger right for you. z In my case, i have an ATV, cars and solar batteries which are 6 volts. This charger can charge flooded batteries and AGM batteries too. Battery tenders usually have lower amperage than a larger dedicated charger.
 

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How soon after charge or run did you take this reading?

The battery is charged at higher voltage, typically 14.4V for fast charging and 13.8V for float charging. The battery's plates have a certain amount of capacitance, and can hold charge like a capacitor, thus reflecting this "plate charge." There is a surprising amount of energy stored in this way. If you let the battery sit for about 5 days without charging or discharging this charge dissipates and the true open-circuit-voltage can be measured.

This is maybe why you have such a high reading.
 
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How soon after charge or run did you take this reading?

The battery is charged at higher voltage, typically 14.4V for fast charging and 13.8V for float charging. The battery's plates have a certain amount of capacitance, and can hold charge like a capacitor, thus reflecting this "plate charge." There is a surprising amount of energy stored in this way. If you let the battery sit for about 5 days without charging or discharging this charge dissipates and the true open-circuit-voltage can be measured.

This is maybe why you have such a high reading.
Exactly!
 
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