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So, a question regarding heat pumps that I haven't been able to find a definitive answer for (if anybody can even answer this).

Let's assume for a moment that my major concern is range, as I have a one-way mileage to work of around 80 miles, and no charger available at work.

Let's also assume that I'll be driving in Michigan winters, but I also don't think that AWD is particularly necessary or desirable. Also assume that I tend to keep the cabin on the cooler side of around 65 degrees or so.

The AWD GT-Line has a range of 274 miles, but has a heat pump. The RWD GT-Line has a range of 310, but no heat pump. These ranges are, of course, at optimal temperatures, and I know to expect a drop off in range during winter, but I have the understanding that the range of the AWD will drop less, due to the heat pump.

My question is, will the addition of the heat pump on the AWD GT-Line provide a range boost such that the AWD GT-Line would get more real world range in winter than the non-heat pump having RWD GT-Line? That is, without the heat pump does the RWD actually have less range than an AWD in cold temperatures?

I'm sorry if I'm asking a question about an issue that's currently being hashed to death (I really just wish Kia America went the Canada route with heat pumps for all).
 

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Cold weather range loss is around 50 to 60 miles for each. In theory the heap pump will reduce that range loss by 19%. That's based on Kia's own figures , so 11.4 miles. Both cars will easily do 160 miles round trip, in fact you would even need to charge to 100% daily which might cause some battery degradation in the long term.
 

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The 100% battery charge is bad for the battery when you do fast charging.
The 100% battery charging and then leave the car unused for longer period is bad. Batteries will drain themselves uncontrolled, which will outbalances batteries as some do this quicker then others.

Charging to 100% and use a 'slow' AC charger should not be a major issue for the battery. Offcourse optimal is keeping the battery between 20-80%, but then still they advise to charge to 100% every 2-4 weeks. As charging to 80% will NOT balance your batteries.

Fast charging DC is advised to stop at 80% as speed drops significantly. Charging fast for last 20% will heat up batteries and is not well in balancing the cells.
Also when you make a long journey it's better to fast charge to 80% and drive to 20-10% and then charge again. Net charge time will be less then when topping to above 80%.

Draining the battery to 0% (Stil 10% left) is one of the worst things you can you, then it;s better to start at 100% and keep the 20% in the end.

Learned a lot with Lipo charging with my RC helicopter with 6S Lipo's, but the EV with thermal mgt is really taking care much better for the battery.
 

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I don't think the heat pump makes much difference with UK temperatures. The nerd that I am watched the heater power over a 25 minute journey today. External 6 degrees, car set at 22 degrees. It started at 3kW, after 4 minutes was down to 2.2kW - then over the next 3 dropped down to about 300w for the next 10 minutes, then it blipped up to 1.2 kW for a minute and then back down . So apart from the initial high draw, I suspect a large part of the 300W was the fan. So If the heat pump was say 3x as efficient would not make a huge difference on a long run. Probably worth it if you do short runs and get in and out the car a lot or its a lot colder.
 

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Matte Gray EV6, Nissan Leaf (2013)
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You sound like me monitoring my home heat pump elec usage and comparing it to space heater.
Please do keep monitoring... would be cool to see graphs by season, driving distance, outside temp, inside temp, and driving mode.:geek::LOL:
 
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