Kia EV6 Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
GT-Line RWD.
Southern CA: Santa Barbara with frequent 200-plus mile freeway trips into Los Angeles.

Overall verdict: Best car we have ever owned.

Local driving
In-town, curvy, hilly back roads, plus a substantial amount of driving on the 101 Freeway (which runs through Santa Barbara).

Verdict:
Even better than we had expected

Driving Dynamics:
Albert Biermann (previously head of the BMW M division) joined Hyundai a few years back. The EV6 was his final car before retiring. He has said that they put more time and effort into this car than any of the previous cars he had done for Hyundai/Kia/Genesis.
It really shows.
At 4200 lbs, the EV6 is cannot be as light and lithe on a tight, twisty back road as our older daughter's manual transmission Golf GTI or her husband's Mazda3 Turbo.
Rather, it is a confident and rewarding GT car.

Even though the EV6 weighs 10% more than our 2017 Audi A4 Premium plus, if feels substantially more agile, more precise and more responsive than the Audi.
Way better throttle response of course.
But also: better ride, and considerably better handling and steering than the Audi.
Also quieter.
And the paddle-shifter controlled regen braking is completely addictive.

Build quality, solidity and finish are at at least as good as those on the Audi.
Interior materials are "modern" rather than Audi traditional, but still very well done.
Our only complaint: in the trim we have, more shiny piano black plastic than we would have preferred. We could have chosen an interior trim with much less black plastic, but we accepted the shiny black to get the lovely suede seats.

We also have a VW Golf Alltrack —which is reasonably close to the GTI and the Mazda3 on narrow curvy back roads.
I was surprised to find that, despite the fact that the EV6 is a significantly wider car, I am already going faster on those roads in the EV6 than I was in the Golf.
Even more surprised to find that I actually prefer to drive the EV6 even on these sports-car roads.

(Note: EV6 4200 lb weight requires Extra Load tires. These have very stiff sidewalls. As I had expected, you do feel some road texture. But we don't find it objectionable. Just very connected to the road.)

Performance:
All we will ever need.
Very linear throttle response.
Right-now torque that does not appear to fall off at higher engine speeds as it does in other EV's I have driven.
A quick lane change into a gap in traffic on the 101 took us from 60 mph to 80 mph in the time it took to steer from one lane into the next.

Local driving range:
Temps in the 50-64F range.
Driven in Normal mode with regen mostly on 2.
Enjoying the car as it was meant to be driven with NO attempt at being frugal.
Consistently within a few miles of the EPA combined range estimate of 310 miles.

Highway driving & LA city driving.
Here is summary of our first trip to LA and back:

We went 4 different places — so a pretty substantial trip.
216 mile round trip.
Started on the coastal plain at just above sea level.
Passed over three passes with elevations of 800, 1000 and 1300 feet respectively.
The first two passes were on the 101 freeway.
For the third (over the Santa Monica Mountains between the San Fernando Valley and LA proper) we used a local road (Beverly Glen Canyon) because the 405 freeway was backed up.
Temperature started out in the 50’s, but was into the 60’s for most of the day.

The majority of the highway driving was at 77 mph on the 101 Freeway.
Set adaptive cruise control at that speed, so the car would move up to 77 whenever there wasn’t someone going slower than that in front of us.
Ran in Eco mode after we got up to cruising speed on the 101.
Normal mode for the rest of the driving.

Range
Ended up with 47 miles of range left.
So a total range of 263 miles for this kind of driving — right about what I had expected for this trip at these temps.
85% of the EPA 310 mile estimated combined range.

Regen braking
This is one of the aspects of EV’s that really changes how you drive.
Especially in the Hyundai/Kia/Genesis cars that give you paddle shifters that let you change the level of regen on the fly.
Like shifting gears.
I had thought that these paddle shifters would quickly become essential.
I was right.

As noted above, we came over Beverly Glen Canyon because the 405 was backed up.
Ran from the top of the mountain range down to the flats of Beverly Hills barely having to touch the brake or the accelerator.
Only used the brake to come to a stop at a stop sign or traffic light and accelerator to get back up to speed.
Came down most of the way with the regen at level 2 to provide engine braking.
Dropped down to level 0 when the road was less steep and I wanted to pick up speed.
Up to Level 3 when needed to avoid closing up on the cars in front.

On the 101: never had to touch the brakes all the way down the big hill that drops about 800 ft into the coastal plain before Camarillo — mostly stayed in regen level 2.
When on regen the car feels very controlled.

Driving experience
As I had expected that the combination of a smooth EV with very linear throttle response and very good Level 2 driving assist makes a big difference in stress and fatigue on the freeway stretches.
And, by this time, I already knew how responsive and confident the EV6 feels on a curvy back road.

What I hadn’t expected was how much easier and less stressful it is to drive in city traffic
The power comes on so smoothly and evenly — as does the regen when you want to slow down.
Again, the paddles really help modulate the slowing from regen as you need to.
You find yourself just easily ghosting along.

And, as on the Interstate, the situational awareness provided red blind spot warnings in the heads-up display, the excellent side mirrors — and the blind spot camera views on the driver’s screen — give you a ton of confidence.

Bottom line
We are in love with this car.
We have not driven either of our ICE cars since we got the EV6.
No reason to ever do so — unless we plan a long road trip.
(The Audi has an honest 450 mile range at a 85mph — which is great when you want to make a 900 mile trip on one day.)
So, we will probably keep that car around for a little while.
Until we admit to ourselves that we probably won't be making many more 900 - 1200 mile road trips.
 

·
Registered
2022 EV6 GT-L RWD, 1973 Triumph TR6
Joined
·
222 Posts
Excellent review! Thank you. Love your experience and it matches mine.

I love driving the EV6 in all situations. I’m finding the range, as it warms up here in Las Vegas, to be better than advertised. The acceleration is addictive.

Despite the greater range in our RAV4, we will be making all out long trips in the EV6. Why? Because it’s more fun to drive, we are both retired so we don‘t have to make a 900 mile trip in one day, and charging, while it may add time to the trip, is less expensive that gas, especially now.

We retired from SoCal to Vegas so we are familiar with your route and it is fun to drive. We will make similar trips to visit our children and grandchildren still in SoCal.

Agsin, thanks for taking the time to write your experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
490 Posts
And that's the beauty of being able to select various regen modes on these vehicles--Level 0 (Coast) on downhills to help minimize battery consumption, then flip to higher regen Levels to help slow you down on said downhills while at the same time being able to recoup some of that energy back into the battery.

OP--I can relate to the drive you took down there in SoCal--my two daughters go to school in UCSB and UCI so I am somewhat-familiar with driving to/from SoCal (I'm in NorCal) and at some point before school's out for the summer I plan on driving my EV6 down there to see how it fares.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
And that's the beauty of being able to select various regen modes on these vehicles--Level 0 (Coast) on downhills to help minimize battery consumption, then flip to higher regen Levels to help slow you down on said downhills while at the same time being able to recoup some of that energy back into the battery.

OP--I can relate to the drive you took down there in SoCal--my two daughters go to school in UCSB and UCI so I am somewhat-familiar with driving to/from SoCal (I'm in NorCal) and at some point before school's out for the summer I plan on driving my EV6 down there to see how it fares.
Out of curiosity, are there any tests that have been done to show whether keeping the EV6 at say i-Pedal all the time or playing around with the regen level gives the most mileage? Would be really curious to know which method is best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Great write up. This is my first EV and I just took my first trip in it this weekend up to our ski condo at Sugarloaf in Maine. 130-mile trip in 40-ish temps used about 40% of the battery. Coming back was even better as it's more downhill:) I agree with your paddle analogy to shifting, I am finding I am using them like a downshift control. I wish I could adjust while in cruise control. I have a tough time wrapping my head around the climate control options. I get it but I am not used to the concept of having to tell the auto-climate to use heat. If the desired temp is greater than cabin temp then the system should just use the heater, right? Am I missing something?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Out of curiosity, are there any tests that have been done to show whether keeping the EV6 at say i-Pedal all the time or playing around with the regen level gives the most mileage? Would be really curious to know which method is best.
I-pedal keeps the front motor engaged in AWD models so it lowers the range compared to using Normal or Eco modes.
 

·
Registered
2022 EV6 GT-Line AWD Aurora Black Pearl
Joined
·
249 Posts
I-pedal keeps the front motor engaged in AWD models so it lowers the range compared to using Normal or Eco modes.
My strategy for increasing range. I don't need more range, but it's fun and useful to try to get as much range as possible.

1) Use cruise control as much as possible. It's a good strategy in an ICE car. It's a good strategy with "dumb" cruise control. It's a good strategy in the EV6. It also greatly reduces driver fatigue.

2) Use Eco mode (including Eco climate mode) unless other modes are needed. It uses the front motor less than the other modes. Notice I said "less than". If the display is to be believed, even Eco mode still uses the front motor for acceleration sometimes.

3) When slowing down, use maximum regen. Use the left hand to engage i-pedal mode. In general, when not using cruise control, use level 1 regen, but use the paddles like shifters to control speed when decelerating.

That being said, that advice isn't really that useful The only time you care about range will be on trips, which will be mostly highways at high speeds. Just use cruise control and Eco drive mode. The rest won't matter. For local roads, use whatever level of regen is most comfortable and useful. It's not going to affect range that much at 30 MPH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Great write up. This is my first EV and I just took my first trip in it this weekend up to our ski condo at Sugarloaf in Maine. 130-mile trip in 40-ish temps used about 40% of the battery. Coming back was even better as it's more downhill:) I agree with your paddle analogy to shifting, I am finding I am using them like a downshift control. I wish I could adjust while in cruise control. I have a tough time wrapping my head around the climate control options. I get it but I am not used to the concept of having to tell the auto-climate to use heat. If the desired temp is greater than cabin temp then the system should just use the heater, right? Am I missing something?
Very impressive!
40% for 130 miles translates into 325 miles of range and 4.2 miles per kWh!

As with every other car with cruise control that I have driven, you can toggle the set speed up and down in 1 or 5 mph increments. This works for setting the speed for HDA as well as for simple cruise control. There is a place in the display that tells you the speed you have set.

In Interstate hwy driving I have been setting the speed control for a few mph faster than the general flow of traffic.
When there is no-one immediately in front us the EV6 will gradually accelerate up to the speed I have set.
Then maintain that speed until it catches up with a slower car in our lane that it can lock onto.
Love the way the heads up display shows you when it does this.

We have not yet driven in weather cold enough to need heat.
The AWD cars are equipped for cold weather with heat pumps and heated rear seats.
The RWD cars are not.
So they have to rely on an electric heater —which is a bigger power draw.
My understanding is that Kia gives you several ways to conserve power by limiting what you heat: Seats, steering wheel, driver only etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
490 Posts
Out of curiosity, are there any tests that have been done to show whether keeping the EV6 at say i-Pedal all the time or playing around with the regen level gives the most mileage? Would be really curious to know which method is best.
There is a Youtube video out there where someone did a comparo by driving the same loop of road in both i-Pedal and non-i-Pedal modes--he got a better overall miles/kWh average (not by a whole lot) when not using i-Pedal. i-Pedal would probably be more beneficial from a range perspective when used on a RWD EV6 vs. an AWD EV6.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Despite the greater range in our RAV4, we will be making all out long trips in the EV6. Why? Because it’s more fun to drive, we are both retired so we don‘t have to make a 900 mile trip in one day, and charging, while it may add time to the trip, is less expensive that gas, especially now.
While not yet quite retired, a big issue with advancing age is the need for frequent potty breaks. The interval between charges is just about right, and the charging time is long enough for facility use, grab a drink, stretch the legs without any real wait.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
There is a Youtube video out there where someone did a comparo by driving the same loop of road in both i-Pedal and non-i-Pedal modes--he got a better overall miles/kWh average (not by a whole lot) when not using i-Pedal. i-Pedal would probably be more beneficial from a range perspective when used on a RWD EV6 vs. an AWD EV6.
Very interesting. I've always been of the thinking that any kind of regen or one pedal driving would help regain the most amount. Never thought that it would make a difference on RWD vs AWD, at least for the EV6.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
490 Posts
Very interesting. I've always been of the thinking that any kind of regen or one pedal driving would help regain the most amount. Never thought that it would make a difference on RWD vs AWD, at least for the EV6.
If Kia's own advertised specs on range are any indication, then yes i-Pedal regen would not be nearly as beneficial on a AWD vs. RWD--274 mile range for AWD vs. 310 mile range for RWD (on 77.4 kWh battery pack). You gotta pick your spots as to under what type of circumstances would it be beneficial to use regen--e.g., when on a downgrade it is best to be in Coast (i.e., Level 0) mode since less energy is consumed in that mode vs. energy consumed from having to use the accelerator pedal to accelerate or maintain velocity. Disclaimer--this is all speculation on my part, I imagine more knowledgable experts can offer more accurate analysis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
If Kia's own advertised specs on range are any indication, then yes i-Pedal regen would not be nearly as beneficial on a AWD vs. RWD--274 mile range for AWD vs. 310 mile range for RWD (on 77.4 kWh battery pack). You gotta pick your spots as to under what type of circumstances would it be beneficial to use regen--e.g., when on a downgrade it is best to be in Coast (i.e., Level 0) mode since less energy is consumed in that mode vs. energy consumed from having to use the accelerator pedal to accelerate or maintain velocity. Disclaimer--this is all speculation on my part, I imagine more knowledgable experts can offer more accurate analysis.
Thanks for the extra info. The bolded part is where I have trouble accepting but I only come with experience and knowledge from a Tesla perspective. On a Tesla, going down a hill is mostly in regen mode and there have been cases where people have added more range to their vehicle than what they started with by the time they get down to the bottom. The pedal is not really used to accelerate the car so I don't think that any energy would be used. I'm sure there's more testing that could be done but very cool results all across.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Living in Chicago I have not gotten close to 300 miles on a charge. Been closer to 220 with i-pedal and normal drive mode in my FE. Been a little disappointing from a range perspective. Love everything else about the car so far (except for the mobile app and remote climate start not working almost ever)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
490 Posts
Thanks for the extra info. The bolded part is where I have trouble accepting but I only come with experience and knowledge from a Tesla perspective. On a Tesla, going down a hill is mostly in regen mode and there have been cases where people have added more range to their vehicle than what they started with by the time they get down to the bottom. The pedal is not really used to accelerate the car so I don't think that any energy would be used. I'm sure there's more testing that could be done but very cool results all across.
I guess that from a purely data-driven standpoint it boils down to this--is the amount of energy recouped from downhill regen greater than the amount of energy saved (i.e., not consumed) as a result of relying on gravity to assist in maintaining or increasing the vehicle's velocity? Not sure if you're experienced it in your EV6, but you'd be surprised at how much more velocity it can easily pick up while on a (decent and lengthy) downgrade when in Coast/Level 0 regen mode compared to how much velocity an ICE vehicle can pick up in top gear under the same set of circumstances. Unless you are using i-Pedal mode to help bring your vehicle to a complete stop, any use of regen during driving implies that at some point you will need to use the accelerator to regain momentum/velocity that is lost during regen mode usage, whereas under the right set of circumstances in Coast mode you don't need to accelerate until/unless you drop down below the desired speed; once you flatten out after reaching the bottom of the descent your vehicle is still probably carrying enough momentum to maintain the desired velocity for a bit longer before you eventually need to engage the accelerator--meaning you can delay acceleration for a bit which means not needing to consume additional battery energy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Living in Chicago I have not gotten close to 300 miles on a charge. Been closer to 220 with i-pedal and normal drive mode in my FE. Been a little disappointing from a range perspective. Love everything else about the car so far (except for the mobile app and remote climate start not working almost ever)
I too am in Chicago, out far west Lake Holiday. I get 201 on a full charge according to the display. I have Winter mode still on as it's still cold in the mornings. I use Eco and i-padal auto most of the time for under 40 mph and I don't use i-padal and am in Normal mode over 40 mph. Just waiting for the nicer weather, turn off Winter mode and see if there is any increase in range. Absolutely love my EV6 FE AWD. Better then paying 4.40 a gallon in my Grand Cherokee Limited X. I just installed the ChargePoint Flex 6-50 Level 2 charger. Great purchase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
GT-Line RWD.
Southern CA: Santa Barbara with frequent 200-plus mile freeway trips into Los Angeles.

Overall verdict: Best car we have ever owned.

Local driving
In-town, curvy, hilly back roads, plus a substantial amount of driving on the 101 Freeway (which runs through Santa Barbara).

Verdict:
Even better than we had expected

Driving Dynamics:
Albert Biermann (previously head of the BMW M division) joined Hyundai a few years back. The EV6 was his final car before retiring. He has said that they put more time and effort into this car than any of the previous cars he had done for Hyundai/Kia/Genesis.
It really shows.
At 4200 lbs, the EV6 is cannot be as light and lithe on a tight, twisty back road as our older daughter's manual transmission Golf GTI or her husband's Mazda3 Turbo.
Rather, it is a confident and rewarding GT car.

Even though the EV6 weighs 10% more than our 2017 Audi A4 Premium plus, if feels substantially more agile, more precise and more responsive than the Audi.
Way better throttle response of course.
But also: better ride, and considerably better handling and steering than the Audi.
Also quieter.
And the paddle-shifter controlled regen braking is completely addictive.

Build quality, solidity and finish are at at least as good as those on the Audi.
Interior materials are "modern" rather than Audi traditional, but still very well done.
Our only complaint: in the trim we have, more shiny piano black plastic than we would have preferred. We could have chosen an interior trim with much less black plastic, but we accepted the shiny black to get the lovely suede seats.

We also have a VW Golf Alltrack —which is reasonably close to the GTI and the Mazda3 on narrow curvy back roads.
I was surprised to find that, despite the fact that the EV6 is a significantly wider car, I am already going faster on those roads in the EV6 than I was in the Golf.
Even more surprised to find that I actually prefer to drive the EV6 even on these sports-car roads.

(Note: EV6 4200 lb weight requires Extra Load tires. These have very stiff sidewalls. As I had expected, you do feel some road texture. But we don't find it objectionable. Just very connected to the road.)

Performance:
All we will ever need.
Very linear throttle response.
Right-now torque that does not appear to fall off at higher engine speeds as it does in other EV's I have driven.
A quick lane change into a gap in traffic on the 101 took us from 60 mph to 80 mph in the time it took to steer from one lane into the next.

Local driving range:
Temps in the 50-64F range.
Driven in Normal mode with regen mostly on 2.
Enjoying the car as it was meant to be driven with NO attempt at being frugal.
Consistently within a few miles of the EPA combined range estimate of 310 miles.

Highway driving & LA city driving.
Here is summary of our first trip to LA and back:

We went 4 different places — so a pretty substantial trip.
216 mile round trip.
Started on the coastal plain at just above sea level.
Passed over three passes with elevations of 800, 1000 and 1300 feet respectively.
The first two passes were on the 101 freeway.
For the third (over the Santa Monica Mountains between the San Fernando Valley and LA proper) we used a local road (Beverly Glen Canyon) because the 405 freeway was backed up.
Temperature started out in the 50’s, but was into the 60’s for most of the day.

The majority of the highway driving was at 77 mph on the 101 Freeway.
Set adaptive cruise control at that speed, so the car would move up to 77 whenever there wasn’t someone going slower than that in front of us.
Ran in Eco mode after we got up to cruising speed on the 101.
Normal mode for the rest of the driving.

Range
Ended up with 47 miles of range left.
So a total range of 263 miles for this kind of driving — right about what I had expected for this trip at these temps.
85% of the EPA 310 mile estimated combined range.

Regen braking
This is one of the aspects of EV’s that really changes how you drive.
Especially in the Hyundai/Kia/Genesis cars that give you paddle shifters that let you change the level of regen on the fly.
Like shifting gears.
I had thought that these paddle shifters would quickly become essential.
I was right.

As noted above, we came over Beverly Glen Canyon because the 405 was backed up.
Ran from the top of the mountain range down to the flats of Beverly Hills barely having to touch the brake or the accelerator.
Only used the brake to come to a stop at a stop sign or traffic light and accelerator to get back up to speed.
Came down most of the way with the regen at level 2 to provide engine braking.
Dropped down to level 0 when the road was less steep and I wanted to pick up speed.
Up to Level 3 when needed to avoid closing up on the cars in front.

On the 101: never had to touch the brakes all the way down the big hill that drops about 800 ft into the coastal plain before Camarillo — mostly stayed in regen level 2.
When on regen the car feels very controlled.

Driving experience
As I had expected that the combination of a smooth EV with very linear throttle response and very good Level 2 driving assist makes a big difference in stress and fatigue on the freeway stretches.
And, by this time, I already knew how responsive and confident the EV6 feels on a curvy back road.

What I hadn’t expected was how much easier and less stressful it is to drive in city traffic
The power comes on so smoothly and evenly — as does the regen when you want to slow down.
Again, the paddles really help modulate the slowing from regen as you need to.
You find yourself just easily ghosting along.

And, as on the Interstate, the situational awareness provided red blind spot warnings in the heads-up display, the excellent side mirrors — and the blind spot camera views on the driver’s screen — give you a ton of confidence.

Bottom line
We are in love with this car.
We have not driven either of our ICE cars since we got the EV6.
No reason to ever do so — unless we plan a long road trip.
(The Audi has an honest 450 mile range at a 85mph — which is great when you want to make a 900 mile trip on one day.)
So, we will probably keep that car around for a little while.
Until we admit to ourselves that we probably won't be making many more 900 - 1200 mile road trips.
The perfect person to ask. I have the same A4 as you and wanted to know how the Ev6’s ride compares to the A4. Would you say the ev6 ride is stiffer, softer or the same as the A4. And how does the feel of the steering compare? I have the A4 steering set to the stiffest setting which I really like. Thanks for your answers.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top