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Just curious to find out the best or average interstate efficiency you have gotten in your EV6 and what regen mode you were using and avg. speed.

I see people getting in the high 3’s or even 4. The best I seem to get is 2.9/3.0 running auto regen and going about 70 MPH. I realize there are other factors, but I am curious to know if my results are normal.

Thanks
 

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2022 EV6 GT-Line Yacht Blue
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Yeah other factors unfortunately are huge.

Case in point I just did a range test to compare some aftermarket wide wheels and tires vs stock. This was a flat section of highway, 11mi total. At the end of the outbound leg I was 3.6mi/kw. at end of 11mi after return I was 2.8 Must have been a slight breeze or something because nothing else changed and as mention it is flat. My car after a long trip said 3.2mi.kw avg when I 1st bought it.
 

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Just curious to find out the best or average interstate efficiency you have gotten in your EV6 and what regen mode you were using and avg. speed.

I see people getting in the high 3’s or even 4. The best I seem to get is 2.9/3.0 running auto regen and going about 70 MPH. I realize there are other factors, but I am curious to know if my results are normal.

Thanks
I think it's all about the MPH

With an increasing elevation and going 75+ MPH I was 2.5.
Decreasing elevation (the other way) I could get 3.0 going faster.

Going 65 MPH yields much better results (but then you're the slow guy...)

For highway travel, I've been using no regen and just using the regen paddles when I need to slow down. ECO mode and AC/Heat, heated seats/steering wheel when needed. I think the AUTO mode would work just as well but the 'manual' guy in me likes the paddles better.
 

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The only way your regen setting will have a material difference is if you engage i-Pedal on an AWD model. That's because i-Pedal does not permit the front motor to disengage for some reason, but otherwise the regen settings won't affect efficiency.

All regen settings do is adjust the calibration of the throttle. Nothing in the motor or the way the car operates changes. When you dial the regen down to the lower levels, you're getting much less regen when you get off the throttle, but regen still comes on when you apply the brake. Neither your battery nor your motors care which setting this is.

But otherwise, as mentioned earlier, speed is a critical factor. You'll see wide variability with wind, road conditions, and temperature. But all things being equal, the faster you go, the less efficient you are. I went on a 300-mile trip to visit family yesterday. The first 70 miles were on back roads at ~60 MPH, and I averaged 3.2 mi/kWh. From there, I jumped on the highway and averaged 75 MPH where I only got 2.5 mi/kWh. When traveling, I tend to adjust my speed to go as fast as I can while still making the charging destination. I made it to my mid-route charge stop 200 miles in with 5% in the tank. I was doing 78 MPH for most of that last leg, and could have gotten more range if I kept my speed more reasonable.
 

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All regen settings do is adjust the calibration of the throttle. Nothing in the motor or the way the car operates changes. When you dial the regen down to the lower levels, you're getting much less regen when you get off the throttle, but regen still comes on when you apply the brake. Neither your battery nor your motors care which setting this is.
I disagree! (doesn't mean I'm right :)) If you have regen set to 0 and apply the brakes, the brakes are stopping the car, not the regen. My thought is that the brakes never initiate regen.
 

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I agree with the sentiment that speed seems to be the most influential factor, with 70mph being somewhat of a benchmark of efficiency. I have a 40 min work commute on going predominately 75-78mph the majority of the time. I seem to average around 2.6mi/kwh.
Further, has anyone here ever driven in CA where there’s tons of Tesla/EV drivers? On the freeway none of the EV’s are really going over 70mph usually (even tho they’re certainly capable of more). I postulate Its to preserve efficiency/range during longer commutes
 

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I disagree! (doesn't mean I'm right :)) If you have regen set to 0 and apply the brakes, the brakes are stopping the car, not the regen. My thought is that the brakes never initiate regen.
I don't remember who, but someone else in another thread mentioned that setting regen to "0" deactivates the system for the first ten brake applications. The idea being that you can clean rust off the brake rotors by setting regen to zero before the system starts applying regen again.

I know from monitoring the data that regen increases substantially when I hit the brake on level 3. My front motor stays disengaged when I roll off the throttle, but engages as regen climbs when I fade into the brake pedal. I believe it will do this in level 0 after those first ten applications, but I haven't tried it.
 

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If I keep it to around 70MPH in mild weather (little/no heat or AC), I get around 3.4 m/kWh (AWD GT-Line). Speed can have a significant impact, since aerodynamic drag increases with the square of speed. Cold weather can also have a significant impact, not just due to the energy required to heat the cabin, but also due to increased drag from denser air. Cold temps can also increase tire rolling resistance. Depending on the conditions and how you drive, it can be beneficial to set regen to 0 on the highway. It's very easy to unintentionally invoke regen by letting off the accelerator to slightly reduce speed due to hills, traffic, etc. (and this also happens with cruise control). Motors, inverters, batteries, etc. are not 100% efficient at transferring energy. When you accelerate, you might get somewhere around 80% of the energy stored in the battery converted to momentum, then when you regenerate you might experience another 20% loss in converting that momentum back into stored energy in the battery. With regen set to 0, that coaxes you into more efficient driving: leaving enough buffer between you and the car ahead so you aren't regenerating to maintain a proper gap, allowing a little speed-up downhill rather than regenerating, etc. You just have to be mindful and re-engage regeneration if you really do need to actively slow down. Otherwise hitting the brakes could result in wasteful friction braking, unless you've already gone through enough wasteful braking events to get past the disc cleaning mode.
 

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It is possible to achieve low-3 miles/kWh even on an AWD with 20" tires, obviously various factors need to fall into place in order to get those kinds of numbers; I can personally attest to that since the vast majority of miles I've accumulated on my EV6 FE have been at typical highway/freeway speeds on mainly-flat terrain; I try to keep my max speed to 72 mph (with an occassional burst when needed)--HVAC is on Auto mode, ambient temps in the 70F or higher range. I will say that lately though my efficiency has started to trend downwards--I'm seeing very low-3s or high-2s due to ambient temps currently being in the 60s or lower (when travelling during nighttime hours)
 

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Temps in the 80s, clear weather, properly Inflated tires, A/C Off, Wind AWD in normal mode....

Did 36 mile loop today. 14 miles surface streets, 22 miles toll road. Surface streets smart cruise set to 46 mph. Let the car drive, as it's smarter and more efficient than I am. Toll road cruise set at 78 w an ego blast to triple digits for about 2.1 miles. (Damn Guns-n- Roses) ...

Averaged 3.6 miles per kWh
 

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Temps in the 80s, clear weather, properly Inflated tires, A/C Off, Wind AWD in normal mode....

Did 36 mile loop today. 14 miles surface streets, 22 miles toll road. Surface streets smart cruise set to 46 mph. Let the car drive, as it's smarter and more efficient than I am. Toll road cruise set at 78 w an ego blast to triple digits for about 2.1 miles. (Damn Guns-n- Roses) ...

Averaged 3.6 miles per kWh
Now I’m curious. What Guns-n-Roses song?
 

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I don't remember who, but someone else in another thread mentioned that setting regen to "0" deactivates the system for the first ten brake applications. The idea being that you can clean rust off the brake rotors by setting regen to zero before the system starts applying regen again.
That seems correct. It wouldn't make sense for the car to disable regen entirely when set to 0. The car probably just adjusts the regen intensity to match what traditional brakes would feel like -- i.e. coasting when no pedal is being pressed and only decelerating when the brake is pressed.

agree with the sentiment that speed seems to be the most influential factor, with 70mph being somewhat of a benchmark of efficiency. I have a 40 min work commute on going predominately 75-78mph the majority of the time. I seem to average around 2.6mi/kwh.
Further, has anyone here ever driven in CA where there’s tons of Tesla/EV drivers? On the freeway none of the EV’s are really going over 70mph usually (even tho they’re certainly capable of more). I postulate Its to preserve efficiency/range during longer commutes
That's surprising and good information to counter all the people who say EVs/Teslas like to drive really fast. I'm sure some of those drivers do but not the vast majority of them on everyday drives.

I'd say that 70-72 MPH is a good upper limit for road trip efficiency where you have to stretch range to make it to the next charger. If you get 3.0 mi/kWh, you'll make it 210 miles on 90% battery charge (70 out of 77.4 kWh used). For every 0.1 mi/kWh over or under the 3.0 benchmark, you'll get 7 additional/fewer miles on a 90% charge.

Consumption (mi/kWh)90% battery (70 kWh) range
3.6252 mi
3.4238 mi
3.2224 mi
3.0210 mi
2.8196 mi
2.6182 mi
 

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I'd say that 70-72 MPH is a good upper limit for road trip efficiency where you have to stretch range to make it to the next charger. If you get 3.0 mi/kWh, you'll make it 210 miles on 90% battery charge (70 out of 77.4 kWh used). For every 0.1 mi/kWh over or under the 3.0 benchmark, you'll get 7 additional/fewer miles on a 90% charge.

Consumption (mi/kWh)90% battery (70 kWh) range
3.6252 mi
3.4238 mi
3.2224 mi
3.0210 mi
2.8196 mi
2.6182 mi
i’m curious why you chose to do this chart at 90% SOC rather than 80% or 100%, the two most likely departure SOC?
 

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I’m curious why you chose to do this chart at 90% SOC rather than 80% or 100%, the two most likely departure SOC?
The chart references 90% battery capacity (70 kWh out of 77.4 -- so technically it's 90.44%), not 90% state of charge. Sorry I was unclear in my language.
90% battery could mean from 100 to 10% SoC since most people would want at least a 10% buffer for weather. Few people would want to use every bit of the battery and run it down to 0%. But 90% can also refer to the energy from 90% SoC to 0% SoC.

I created this better chart in Google Docs (exported as a PDF) that includes calculations for metric, 80% battery, and each 10% battery. This chart rounds down 77.4 kWh to 77 kWh when making all calculations to give just a bit more buffer. (e.g. 0.9 * 77).
 

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The chart references 90% battery capacity (70 kWh out of 77.4 -- so technically it's 90.44%), not 90% state of charge. Sorry I was unclear in my language.
90% battery could mean from 100 to 10% SoC since most people would want at least a 10% buffer for weather. Few people would want to use every bit of the battery and run it down to 0%. But 90% can also refer to the energy from 90% SoC to 0% SoC.

I created this better chart in Google Docs (exported as a PDF) that includes calculations for metric, 80% battery, and each 10% battery. This chart rounds down 77.4 kWh to 77 kWh when making all calculations to give just a bit more buffer. (e.g. 0.9 * 77).
Thanks! That’s very helpful, especially the range for every 10% as per mi/kWh!
 
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