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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi. I am a new owner of the EV6 Gt line S without a heat pump. The car has travelled less than 100 miles. I live in the NW of England where it’s dropped close to freezing on the last two nights. In the morning with the car close to fully charged I have been a little shocked to see the range apparently drop by 50 miles to a range of 240 miles when the heating is initially turned on (moderate 22 degrees set). I was wondering if this was common with other EV6 drivers. The car is kept on a driveway and on the second day of ownership I woke to find not only a frozen windscreen but also frozen door handles that wouldn’t pop out despite pre heating the car. I ended up pouring hot water over each handle which can’t be good? I wonder how owners in much colder climates cope with this? Thx
 

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Okay, definitely concerning as someone looking to buy an EV6 in Canada where winter temps of -15C or colder are not outside the norm. Also, I battled the manufacturer of my current vehicle for almost 2 winters when it was brand new to address consistently freezing door mechanisms that actually prevented me from entering the vehicle and resulted in missing some important meetings!! They finally replaced the entire guts of the doors which seems to have solved the issue, and now, there is an official recall for one of the door mechanism parts. So, the scars of freezing door mechanisms has me concerned with your report. Although, the EV6 would fit in my garage, whereas my current vehicle stays in the driveway.

You are right though, pouring hot water probably not a good idea as it could result in something cracking from rapid temp change, but could result in exacerbating the issue when said water re-freezes. I would be more inclined to first try a hair dryer, or a heat gun at a safe distance, and slowly warm it up.

Hoping this is not a common issue, and that you are able to get it resolved!
 

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To address the mileage question, yes the numbers look about right to me. Same spec car and I did a 266 mile round trip yesterday (2-4 degrees, heating at 21 degrees, mix of day and night driving) and averaged 2.9 - 3 mile/kw and range of car indicated 231 miles when started which all seems about right. For comparison my wife’s Fiat 500e has a company stated range of 199 miles and in same conditions does about 125 miles. Bottom line is cold and very hot is not the friend of EV’s.
 

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This is normal for any EVs in colder climates. When season is winter ranges drop about 20%. So do not pay attention to the mileage/kilometer meter in the car just look at the SOC (state of Charge percentage). This normal having heat pump will help a little with range anxiety as you pre condition the car before you leave the house while it is still plugged into the charger so it uses the homes power instead of the cars to run the systems needed.

Just do a google search or go to any EV forum and search range loss in cold climates you will come up with page on pages of posts some new ones every day.

Here is a good run down from the MachEforum:

Hello, it looks like you are new and might be complaining about your cold-weather range decrease without having referenced the numerous threads on this subject. Due to high volume of questions, this is a pre-written response to help alleviate your concerns. Remember to use the search function before creating a new thread, as forum members are fatigued with new users asking this same question over and over again almost daily.

TL;DR - Range decreases due to cold weather, the range display is a highly pessimistic guess not to be taken literally, and you might update your software if you want to see a higher number.

First, understand that some range loss in cold weather is normal due to the laws of physics. Chemical reactions in the battery are more sluggish, the air is more dense to push through causing more drag, and your heater takes more electricity to run than A/C. The colder it is, the less your range will be because of these factors.

Second, know that the range you see on your display is just a guess. It can be off 40% or more from reality on some software versions. Do not take the number literally or you will be upset, nothing is wrong with your car, it is not the true range. Unlike other brands like Tesla, Ford has made the reading extremely conservative and sensitive to cold temperatures on purpose, so that you don’t strand yourself in cold weather. Expect a sharp decrease in the reading below about 50ºF/10ºC that is greater than reality.

Third, be aware that software updates have been released that increase the accuracy of the range display in cold weather significantly. If you haven’t had software updates done at your dealer yet, you should consider doing so because you are missing out on a lot of improvements (CSP 21P22 released Nov 22, 2021). After the update, you may see up to 30% more range displayed even though your actual range is unchanged.

You can calculate your actual range yourself by simply noting the battery percentage before and after a trip greater than 20 miles. For example, if a 25 mile trip took 12% battery, 25/.12 = 208 mile range at full charge. Another method is to multiply your mi/kWh efficiency by your battery capacity, either 88 kWh for extended range or 68 kWh for standard range. For example, if you are getting 2.6 mi/kWh in an extended range, 2.6*88 = 229 miles of range. Please note that in cold weather, the actual capacity of the pack will temporarily decrease some, so 80/62 kWh may be a better capacity figure to use for an estimate in cold weather. Full capacity will return next summer with warmer temps.

The amount of actual range loss may vary due to many factors, but to provide a generic reference, a loss of 35% at 20ºF/-7ºC would be typical in average driving. This would equate to a range of approximately 176 mi / 137 mi for extended/standard packs. The percentage range drop compared to summer is also inversely proportional to the speed you drive due to the heater’s percentage of total energy use. If you drive in a city you may see a 40% drop in range, vs. a 25% drop driving on the interstate.

In summary, remember the range display is always a pessimistic guess, and your actual range will be greater than indicated. Remember to get those dealer updates done to increase your satisfaction. Parking in a garage, plugging in, and using departure times will help keep the battery warm and increase your actual range. Enjoy driving your electric car after gaining an understanding of normal cold weather range loss and the pessimistic guessing of the range display, affectionally called the GOM (Guess-O-Meter).
 

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Here in Denmark we had -11C on Christmas eve, but luckily my EV6 has a heat pump, so within a few minutes it was nice and mostly frostfree. If I had used the KIA connect app, and pre-warmed the car, I guess it would have been even better.
So to all new buyers in frost areas, INCLUDE the heat pump!

(y)
 

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Normal rule of thumb seems to be real world range is around 80% of the WLTP figures ( for info these are based on a 30 min test in a lab so relation to real world is marginal. Then for winter assume 80% of the real world range given the impacts of the colder temps. So expect winter range to be somewhere in the mid 60 %age of WLTP.

In my 2 day loan of a GT-Line S RWD, with overnight frost and max day time temperatures of around 4, I managed 2.8miles/KwH, mixed driving inc dual carriageway around the Welsh border of 174 miles. So indicating a range of around 220 miles from a full charge.
 

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Here in Denmark we had -11C on Christmas eve, but luckily my EV6 has a heat pump, so within a few minutes it was nice and mostly frostfree. If I had used the KIA connect app, and pre-warmed the car, I guess it would have been even better.
So to all new buyers in frost areas, INCLUDE the heat pump!

(y)
Hi am new to this heat pump , and am yet to receive my ev6, I have ordered with a heatpump. Do you activate the heatpump from an app and that heats the battery's and the cabin before you drive .
Does it need to be plugged into the charger for heatpump to come on .

Kind Regards Mark
 

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Seems a lot have covered range. Im An owner and have been getting 250+ on journeys averaging 50mph.

it’s interesting you mention the handles as my wife just said this morning that she loves the design. The car was frozen but because the handles are flush and you push in firstly to open them, it automatically broke the ice and the door opened no problem at all.
She was saying it was brilliant design!

that’s in air model where handles don’t auto pop out and maybe it’s different if the ice is really thick? But we have found no issues so far in relation to the handles other than first time passengers having no idea how to use them 😁
 

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I was wondering about this too.
Hi. I am a new owner of the EV6 Gt line S without a heat pump. The car has travelled less than 100 miles. I live in the NW of England where it’s dropped close to freezing on the last two nights. In the morning with the car close to fully charged I have been a little shocked to see the range apparently drop by 50 miles to a range of 240 miles when the heating is initially turned on (moderate 22 degrees set). I was wondering if this was common with other EV6 drivers. The car is kept on a driveway and on the second day of ownership I woke to find not only a frozen windscreen but also frozen door handles that wouldn’t pop out despite pre heating the car. I ended up pouring hot water over each handle which can’t be good? I wonder how owners in much colder climates cope with this? Thx
It seems to be normal as others have said ( and from what I have read) but there is also the consideration that there is a lot of estimation that goes on until it works out your drive routine.

Hope you don't mind me asking but when did you order your car? and is it the AWD or RWD?
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I was wondering about this too.


It seems to be normal as others have said ( and from what I have read) but there is also the consideration that there is a lot of estimation that goes on until it works out your drive routine.

Hope you don't mind me asking but when did you order your car? and is it the AWD or RWD?
Thx for the reply. My vehicle is RWD and I ordered it two months ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was wondering about this too.


It seems to be normal as others have said ( and from what I have read) but there is also the consideration that there is a lot of estimation that goes on until it works out your drive routine.

Hope you don't mind me asking but when did you order your car? and is it the AWD or RWD?
Thx for the reply. My vehicle is RWD ordered 2 months ago.
 

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Hi am new to this heat pump , and am yet to receive my ev6, I have ordered with a heatpump. Do you activate the heatpump from an app and that heats the battery's and the cabin before you drive .
Does it need to be plugged into the charger for heatpump to come on .

Kind Regards Mark
Hi Mark
It is not necessary to start the heat pump that is done automatically, but via tha KIA app "Connect" you can preheat the car before you need to go, and it does not have to be plugged in!
 

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Hi Mark
It is not necessary to start the heat pump that is done automatically, but via tha KIA app "Connect" you can preheat the car before you need to go, and it does not have to be plugged in!
Don't think the heat pump heats the battery either. Hard to be sure but I think it just scavenges heat to help heat the cabin. Unfortunately chilling the battery at the same time in cool/cold weather slowing charging. Keen to know if this interpretation is true. The battery heater is a resistance style heater not a heat pump heater I think. Would be handy to be able to force the battery to be warmed up pre-charging to get closer to the headline very fast charge rates too maybe.
 

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Don't think the heat pump heats the battery either. Hard to be sure but I think it just scavenges heat to help heat the cabin. Unfortunately chilling the battery at the same time in cool/cold weather slowing charging. Keen to know if this interpretation is true. The battery heater is a resistance style heater not a heat pump heater I think. Would be handy to be able to force the battery to be warmed up pre-charging to get closer to the headline very fast charge rates too maybe.
The heat pump and the battery heater is two different things. Here in Scandinavia, both is standard in all versions.
The heat pump is for cabin heating, and the battery heater, as it says, is for heating up the battery prior to charging.
 

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Hi Mark
It is not necessary to start the heat pump that is done automatically, but via tha KIA app "Connect" you can preheat the car before you need to go, and it does not have to be plugged in!
So the heating of the cabin etc is done by the by pump and not the batteries, thus giving slightly more range .
Regards
 

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So is there another resistance heater for the cabin............if no heat pump is fitted?
I think there is a HVAC (heating, ventilation, air-conditioning) system for the cabin and used for cooling the battery too, and a separate specific thing called a heat pump option which is just to give more range by scavenging heat from battery and electronic's waste heat in cold conditions and then used to supplement the heat to the cabin. The heat pump option mentioned in higher specs is only this cabin heating/ range improvement by heat scavenging device nothing to do with battery heating. There also seems to be a cabin resistance heater as a part of the HVAC system, say for when the cabin HVAC is being used to cool the battery during high speed charging ie where in cold conditions the cabin still needs to be heated at the same time. There is a battery resistance heater too used to protect the battery from very low temps and to heat the battery during charging but not as a pre charging heater (this is rumoured to be changing via software update in 2022). Different regions seem to get different setups too. Canada, Norway different from say Spain or Australia. It is complicated and a big secret it seems as almost no information except from Bjorn Nyland's experiments and measurements. I am not absolutely sure, just trying to logically put the pieces together. I wish someone authoritative would confirm this description or give the detail officially, Not advertising blurbs. It is 100% clear there is huge confusion. People being forced to buy with partial understanding in my opinion.
 

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The cabin HVAC system seems to be a reverse cycle ie heat pump based system too with a supplementary resistive heater element. But I believe the heat pump option you pay extra for is an additional heating for cabin only, heat scavenging system. The video above uses heat pump words in the cabin HVAC description (not clear in all other brochure stuff) so confusing that heat pump with the heat pump option, I think.
 
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