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Kia says the EV6's regenerative braking is operated by paddle shifters behind the steering wheel.

There will be be 6 regenerative braking levels to choose from - none, 1 to 3, ‘i-PEDAL’, or auto mode.

Energy recuperation

Maximizing driving range and efficiency

The EV6 is fitted with energy-recuperation technologies to maximize driving range. This includes Kia’s latest-generation energy-efficient heat pump, which scavenges waste heat from the car’s coolant system. This ensures that at minus seven degrees Celsius the car can achieve 80% of the range that would be possible at 25 degrees Celsius.

Also featured is the latest generation of Kia’s smart regenerative braking system, which is operated by paddle shifters behind the steering wheel so drivers can quickly and easily slow the car and recuperate kinetic energy to maximize driving range and efficiency. Drivers can choose from six regenerative braking levels (none, 1 to 3, ‘i-PEDAL’, or auto mode), depending on the desired level of energy recuperation. The system’s ‘i-PEDAL’ driving mode also allows the car to harvest the maximum amount of energy from its brakes, and enables the driver to bring the car to a gentle halt without needing to push the brake pedal.
 

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Kia says the EV6's regenerative braking is operated by paddle shifters behind the steering wheel.

There will be be 6 regenerative braking levels to choose from - none, 1 to 3, ‘i-PEDAL’, or auto mode.

Energy recuperation

Maximizing driving range and efficiency

The EV6 is fitted with energy-recuperation technologies to maximize driving range. This includes Kia’s latest-generation energy-efficient heat pump, which scavenges waste heat from the car’s coolant system. This ensures that at minus seven degrees Celsius the car can achieve 80% of the range that would be possible at 25 degrees Celsius.

Also featured is the latest generation of Kia’s smart regenerative braking system, which is operated by paddle shifters behind the steering wheel so drivers can quickly and easily slow the car and recuperate kinetic energy to maximize driving range and efficiency. Drivers can choose from six regenerative braking levels (none, 1 to 3, ‘i-PEDAL’, or auto mode), depending on the desired level of energy recuperation. The system’s ‘i-PEDAL’ driving mode also allows the car to harvest the maximum amount of energy from its brakes, and enables the driver to bring the car to a gentle halt without needing to push the brake pedal.
@SoulMan Does the i-PEDAL regen actually transition to a true gentle halt or does it continuous slow roll until it approaches another object? And is that the same as 1 pedal options with other BEVs.
 

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@SoulMan Does the i-PEDAL regen actually transition to a true gentle halt or does it continuous slow roll until it approaches another object? And is that the same as 1 pedal options with other BEVs.
I-pedal is the same as 1 pedal.

try youtube and 'ioniq 5'.
There are a lot of test video's of this car.
Of course, Kia can do things different, but a lot will be the same.
like this one (in german)

Or this one in english:
 

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I-pedal is the same as 1 pedal.

try youtube and 'ioniq 5'.
There are a lot of test video's of this car.
Of course, Kia can do things different, but a lot will be the same.
like this one (in german)

Or this one in english:
Yes clearly different. Its been while but I could still understand 75-80 percent of the Deutch, his and Mike's were both very informative. Unfortunately almost enough enticement, hope it doesn't but should the EV6 order process tomorrow bomb out. I may just put down the payment and pursue the Ioniq5.
 

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@SoulMan Does the i-PEDAL regen actually transition to a true gentle halt or does it continuous slow roll until it approaches another object? And is that the same as 1 pedal options with other BEVs.
The iPedal in my experience brings you to a complete halt. I have been using the pedals sometimes in place of braking, should master the trick on when you change them to maximize the no of miles. What should be the best way to use them on Highway? Should we keep it 0 and change accordingly when we need to brake? or should I put it in Auto mode (do you know how?)?
When it is in zero, it runs away, when it is in 1, it drives like a gas car.

Other doubt I have is, let's say I am driving 70 mph on interstate, should I leave the regen braking turned on? Asking this because, when it is in level 2 or 3, if I need to pull away, it seems to me like more energy is needed for the pickup. When it is in zero, it is effortless to pull away.. What setting should I leave when driving on a highway? Sorry for too many questions. I drive a EV6 AWD.
 

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Should i-Pedal really be called i-Paddle? I guess I'm confused because it seems like in i-Pedal mode you're really using the regen paddles to control braking, not the brake pedal (like in 1-pedal driving). Do I have that straight?
 

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Other doubt I have is, let's say I am driving 70 mph on interstate, should I leave the regen braking turned on?
Regen doesn't ever really get turned off. At level 0, it will temporarily revert to friction brakes when you hit the brake pedal to clean them, but it eventually returns to blended braking, where regen is utilized every time you apply the brakes (just like it is in every other mode). In the higher regen levels, it's not that it takes more energy to accelerate, it's simply that the accelerator pedal is re-mapped. For example, in regen level 0, there is no off-throttle regen braking. Position 0 on the accelerator is coasting, and you get full power with the accelerator completely depressed. In level 1, you get some regen braking with the accelerator at position 0. Coasting might be at 5% throttle (I'm making that number up). At level 2, the neutral (coasting) positio might be at 10%, and 0-10% are various levels of braking. Level 3 might have the neutral position at 15%. So if you you're at level 0, cruising along with the accelerator 15% pressed (15% power), then switch to level 1, that 15% throttle position is no longer 15% power. The accelerator input has been remapped, because the range is now 5-100, instead of 0-100. Switch to level 2, and it feels like you've lost power again, because 15% throttle has become an even lower amount of power. The perception is that there is drag on the car, when in reality you are just applying less power, because the effective accelerator position has changed.
 

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Should i-Pedal really be called i-Paddle? I guess I'm confused because it seems like in i-Pedal mode you're really using the regen paddles to control braking, not the brake pedal (like in 1-pedal driving). Do I have that straight?
You don't need the paddles to apply regenerative braking, the main purpose of the paddles is to control the regen MODE. Once in the mode you prefer, you don't need to adjust the paddles (though you can if you want to constantly change the modes). If you have it set in i-pedal mode, you can simply take your foot off the accelerator to brake. You don't need the brake pedal unless you need to decelerate faster than regenerative braking alone can achieve.
 

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If you have it set in i-pedal mode, you can simply take your foot off the accelerator to brake. You don't need the brake pedal unless you need to decelerate faster than regenerative braking alone can achieve.
Maybe I have it switched then. In the owner's manual (p 6-16): "One pedal driving. The drive can stop the vehicle by pulling and holding the left side paddle shifter." Then on 6-17 is i-Pedal which mentions the accelerator. Need to actually get out in my wife's EV6 and drive it to figure these things out I guess.
 

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Maybe I am the only one using the left paddle to go to absolute stop, but I do this all the time while out driving.

My settings, Regen = auto – and max regen. This is because it’s by far the setting that adjusts best to different circumstances in a good way. When have the i-pedal mode it just gets to aggressive, especially since I’m doing lots of highway driving with the HDA-activated and then when I turn it in to paus it’s like the car hits the breaks and this is not comfortable at all on the highway. I would guess its also annoying for anyone behind me since my car all of a sudden breaks and the break lights flicker on and off.
When using auto and getting close to a car in front of me (stoplight for example) firstly the car adjust so it gets more regen the closer I get and when I’m about 3 metres from the car in front of me I just pull the left paddle, this brings my car to a complete stop and “auto-stop” becomes activated for this certain instance which let me take my foot of the break and just relax.

Maybe I’m the odd one out, but I’ve been testing all the different modes and for me personally I much prefer this settings and really miss the “auto-stop” paddle function when driving other cars.
 

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I also now use Auto regen as it gives me 3.8- 4.1 m/kwh at 65/70mph! and some 6m/kwh at slower speeds and when you use your brake pedal regen goes on as well as regen braking working when cars comes close in front. It saved me many miles on my UK road trip this week, 250 miles each way. Here is a quick stat at 65-70mph with auto regen on, 19.13kwh generated! thats almost a quarter of the EV6 battery generated from braking I think.

Look at the Daily stats below, not monthly

Purple Font Material property Screenshot Magenta

Car Vehicle Speedometer Sky White
 
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