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Hi,
I bought the EV6 WIND AWD about 3 weeks ago. I'm loving the car. I do have a question about Regen.
I've gone through most of the threads and I've been trying out all of the different ways to use the regen. I've done i-Pedal, non-automatic using the paddles to shift up and down, Auto and setting it all of the different levels. I've driven using ECO, Normal and Sport trying out all of these different combinations.
So far my I enjoy using the Auto and having the "intensity" set 2 clicks below full (not sure what number that would be).
My question is why am I not seeing any percentage increase on my battery charge? 80% of my driving is local streets and my drive to work is about 26 miles round trip.
The only time I saw the percentage actually increase while driving was when I was going downhill after going over the coast range mountains here in Oregon.
Can anyone help me understand what is going on? Am I not supposed to see the benefit of the regen as an increase in battery charge?

Thank you.
 

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GT-Line 2 (initial 200)
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Hi,
I bought the EV6 WIND AWD about 3 weeks ago. I'm loving the car. I do have a question about Regen.
I've gone through most of the threads and I've been trying out all of the different ways to use the regen. I've done i-Pedal, non-automatic using the paddles to shift up and down, Auto and setting it all of the different levels. I've driven using ECO, Normal and Sport trying out all of these different combinations.
So far my I enjoy using the Auto and having the "intensity" set 2 clicks below full (not sure what number that would be).
My question is why am I not seeing any percentage increase on my battery charge? 80% of my driving is local streets and my drive to work is about 26 miles round trip.
The only time I saw the percentage actually increase while driving was when I was going downhill after going over the coast range mountains here in Oregon.
Can anyone help me understand what is going on? Am I not supposed to see the benefit of the regen as an increase in battery charge?

Thank you.
You'll mainly see it as an improvement in efficiency, especially early in your trip. 1% of the battery is a large amount of energy - 750Wh, enough for ~3 mi of travel. So if you're going downhill for 3 mi I could see a 1% regen, but just braking for a stoplight? That's not very much regen.

(There are other nuances like more energy being required to accelerate than to cruise, and regen braking basically being recuperating that acceleration energy during deceleration. But the key is that you have to do a LOT of regen deceleration to amount to even 1% of your battery).
 

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@robby-d's nailed it. If you had a PHEV, hybrid or smaller battery EV, the percentage of the battery that you recharged will be higher and thus you would see a change in SOC%. But on a large battery vehicle such as the EV6, it'll be tough to see that increase unless you go down a steep hill or a long gentler hill.

The best way to see, assuming your weather conditions are stable that week, is to check your efficiency number under "Drive Info" on the instrument panel (press the the left mode/menu button on the steering wheel to cycle through the menus at the centre of the instrument panel until you see trip information, then press up/down until you get to Drive Info)
 

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To make it quantitative, the empty weight of the car gains potential energy of 1.7 kW-hr (2.2% charge) per thousand feet of elevation gain. Accelerating from zero to 80 mph gains kinetic energy of 0.36 kW-hr (0.46% charge). That's just mass*gravity*height and 1/2 mass*speed^2 from high school physics and some funky unit conversions.

Addendum Traveling just one mile at 80 mph consumes another 0.33 kW-hr in air and rolling resistance (at 3.0 mi/kW-hr, your smileage may vary).
 

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The unmentioned benefit of regen is brake pad wear. You see ev posts of disk rust due to lack of use! It hit home when I went into my Audi dealer for my 20K mile, ICE vehicle oil change and they gave me a $1,500 estimate for brake service.

Use max regen and your pads will probably outlive the 48K brake fluid replacement.
 

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The unmentioned benefit of regen is brake pad wear. You see ev posts of disk rust due to lack of use! It hit home when I went into my Audi dealer for my 20K mile, ICE vehicle oil change and they gave me a $1,500 estimate for brake service.

Use max regen and your pads will probably outlive the 48K brake fluid replacement.
!!! Wow that’s a pricey brake service!

48K is probably a very conservative number. We had an ‘05 Prius and we never changed the pads in the 154k miles we owned it. Mostly city driven too. Granted it was due very soon thereafter but the hybrid battery gave up first.
 

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The point about the brakes rusting is their age, not the miles on them since they aren't being used if you do regen. My '10 Prius is 12 years old and the discs aren't rusty. The Prius does mostly regen. I'm surprised about Say Watt's car needing brake discs after only 20k miles.
 

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It’s an Audi SQ5 with Brembo brakes. They do tend to be “softer” - more grip, faster wear. Audi puts a more even balance between front and rear brakes and the rear calipers are really too small for this setup. Consequently the rear pads go first. Plus Audi wants to replace everything - pads, rotors, bolts, clips, sensors, pine tree air freshener…
 

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That's German ingenuity for you; not to say that domestic and/or Asian-make brake service is much cheaper but I'd venture to guess that the cost of an average brake job on a non-high performance domestic vehicle probably wouldn't run $1500. You might be surprised to learn how they explain the justification for the high cost of a brake job on a German vehicle--they won't just simply replace pads and/or turn rotors--or, what @Say Watt said right above my post.
 

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2022 Kia EVG GT Red
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My commute in my GT RWD is 13 miles. It is a combination of residential streets and open 4 lane. I leave it in normal mode with full regen for the residential part. Not a lot of brake use. Then change to no regen for the open 4 lane only using the paddles to slow down for traffic or lights. This keeps me in the 3.7 to 3.8kwh/mile range. Eco is too sluggish for city driving, I reserve that for longer trips.
 
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