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Figured I'd share this with my fellow EVers. This is U.S. availability. I figure a spare is always worth having if you already have one.



Always be prepared before you drive. The hand-held ergonomic design of the SC1455 is comfortable to hold and the rubber cover on the top is helps keep out water and dirt. 28-feet cord is long enough to reach the driveway from the wall socket. Indoor installation for longer life span. Secure your charger with lighting / leakage / overcurrent / overvoltage protections. LED indicators help read the charging status and are easily visible in the dark.


Charging speed up to 3X faster than a Level 1 charger.
Offers both Level 1 and Level 2 charging options.
Universal connector works with any EV with a standard J1772 connector.
Erganomic Design
LED indicators to show charge status
Reliable Assurance
 

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Better to buy an EVSE that does not tout "with a free adapter it can be changed into level 1, 120V/16A charging with NEMA 5-15", because 1) a NEMA 5-15 receptacle is rated for a maximum of 15 amps, and 2) a 15-amp circuit is only allowed to be loaded to 80% of its rated capacity when a continuous load is applied (3 hours or more equals "continuous"). Connecting a device that will (attempt to) draw 16 amps from a 15-amp circuit because someone "cheats" instead of using a proper NEMA 5-20 plug - which of course won't fit into a NEMA 5-15 receptacle - is not what I'd call wise. If you're lucky a fuse/breaker will trip, if you're not you run the risk of damaging your home's electrical wiring or melting the cheap $1 receptacle that's likely installed in your home.

A much better option is the Webasto TurboCord dual-voltage which limits the current draw on a 120V circuit to 12 amps; it's also UL listed, which can't be said for a lot of the "stuff" out there that advertises 120V/16A charging via a NEMA 5-15 receptacle. After spending $60k for an EV6 why would anyway choose a bargain brand EVSE that comes with inherent safety issues? $230 for the Webasto isn't all that outrageous given the pluses:

Official Charging Partner of Automakers: Webasto is the ONLY official charging station provider of Ford, Nissan, Fiat, Kia, Hyundai, Mitsubishi, Volvo, and Chevrolet. Choose the company that has been vetted, tested and received the stamp of approval for your car.

UL-Listed so you know it's safe: All EV charging companies are not the same. Don't risk buying a charger that does not meet current safety requirements. All of Webasto's chargers are UL-listed, meet strict safety standards and have undergone rigorous testing by automakers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Better to buy an EVSE that does not tout "with a free adapter it can be changed into level 1, 120V/16A charging with NEMA 5-15", because 1) a NEMA 5-15 receptacle is rated for a maximum of 15 amps, and 2) a 15-amp circuit is only allowed to be loaded to 80% of its rated capacity when a continuous load is applied (3 hours or more equals "continuous"). Connecting a device that will (attempt to) draw 16 amps from a 15-amp circuit because someone "cheats" instead of using a proper NEMA 5-20 plug - which of course won't fit into a NEMA 5-15 receptacle - is not what I'd call wise. If you're lucky a fuse/breaker will trip, if you're not you run the risk of damaging your home's electrical wiring or melting the cheap $1 receptacle that's likely installed in your home.

A much better option is the Webasto TurboCord dual-voltage which limits the current draw on a 120V circuit to 12 amps; it's also UL listed, which can't be said for a lot of the "stuff" out there that advertises 120V/16A charging via a NEMA 5-15 receptacle. After spending $60k for an EV6 why would anyway choose a bargain brand EVSE that comes with inherent safety issues? $230 for the Webasto isn't all that outrageous given the pluses:

Official Charging Partner of Automakers: Webasto is the ONLY official charging station provider of Ford, Nissan, Fiat, Kia, Hyundai, Mitsubishi, Volvo, and Chevrolet. Choose the company that has been vetted, tested and received the stamp of approval for your car.

UL-Listed so you know it's safe: All EV charging companies are not the same. Don't risk buying a charger that does not meet current safety requirements. All of Webasto's chargers are UL-listed, meet strict safety standards and have undergone rigorous testing by automakers.
I figured this would be a good "spare" unit. I did see how it would try to "cheat" the charge. The option I was reading was to make sure that each place you're trying to draw from to be on a different circuit. My thought is that these cables are going to be like phone charging cables and it might be a good idea to have one spare in case of an emergency. I figure this would be good for traveling, you can use to charge at a hotel/motel.
 

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A much better option is the Webasto TurboCord dual-voltage which limits the current draw on a 120V circuit to 12 amps; it's also UL listed, which can't be said for a lot of the "stuff" out there that advertises 120V/16A charging via a NEMA 5-15 receptacle. After spending $60k for an EV6 why would anyway choose a bargain brand EVSE that comes with inherent safety issues? $230 for the Webasto isn't all that outrageous given the pluses:

Official Charging Partner of Automakers: Webasto is the ONLY official charging station provider of Ford, Nissan, Fiat, Kia, Hyundai, Mitsubishi, Volvo, and Chevrolet. Choose the company that has been vetted, tested and received the stamp of approval for your car.

UL-Listed so you know it's safe: All EV charging companies are not the same. Don't risk buying a charger that does not meet current safety requirements. All of Webasto's chargers are UL-listed, meet strict safety standards and have undergone rigorous testing by automakers.
The dual voltage model seems to be discontinued.
 

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You can set the EV6 to pull less charge if you go with the Schumacher, right? I thought that is the trick with that one - you'd need to tell the EV6 to slow down if you were on a 15A outlet.

I think the "UL-Listed" angle is much more important for your daily EVSE. If this unit is only for emergencies, and you buy a unit with a lot of good reviews - this might be a tradeoff reasonable people would make.
 

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IF you are aware of the shortcomings of these "120V/16A" non-compliant units - and Schumaker is not the only one who falls under this category - then yes, you could certainly set the EV6 charge rate to limit that. But exactly how many folks who buy these non-compliant units will KNOW and REMEMBER to do that? And two years down the road (so to speak) will everyone who bought these remember to do so?

Taking shortcuts with electrical safety makes zero sense.
 

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I picked up one of these units (Schumacher) and it fits fine in the smaller frunk. I also have the v2l adapter in there too. It's a touch snug, but stuff seems to be ok in there.

Without the v2l adapter, it would fit fine.

(in case anyone else was wondering)
 

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I can't find a portable 120/240V charger for emergencies that is UL listed. I try to avoid having 2 portable chargers, one for 120V and one for 240V. Anyone found anything worthwhile? The Accell charger looks promising and I like that it defaults to 120V 12 AMPs when is unplugged.

Amazon.com: Accell AxFAST Dual-voltage Portable EVSE 16 Amp - 120/240V Electric Vehicle Charger Level 2 compatible with Tesla Chevy Bolt Nissan Leaf Chrysler Pacifica Toyota Prius Hyundai Electric Cars and more : Automotive
 
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