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V2L sure is cool, and I've seen videos of people using it to power vacuums, microwaves, etc etc.

But - most of these things could just plug into the normal outlet.

What's the difference? Does the outlet require the car to be "on"? I'm also assuming the V2L has higher output?
 

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In the US, where many regions (including where I live) have frequent power outages, many people have a backup generator either connected to the whole home or just to the critical load on a sub-panel with 240v split phase input (which I have). 240v split-phase is a system where two live wires transport 120v but in a different phase. The V2L function will typically not be able to handle peak loads regardless of whether it is providing backup power to the whole house or just to the critical load. However, I'm planning to create an in-home battery solution with an invertor and some off-the-shelf LFP batteries, I plan to connect the V2L output to the 240v split-phase input on the inverter as 1900w would be more than the average load in my home. So even if peak load drains the batteries for some time, the batteries will be recharging from the V2L after peak load is over. Two issues:
  • Don't know if V2L can support sustained loads at 1900w
  • In another thread, there is a link to a Kia video that states that you can't use the V2L adapter and the internal power outlet socket at the same time. Not sure if that only applies to 220v output or also to 110v output. Would appreciate it if someone in the USA can try that out.

If you can only use one port then I think what might work is a step-up transformer and then an auto-transformer to create 240v split-phase. If you can use both ports simultaneously then just the auto-transformer might be able to do the job.

The cost of the solution would be about $600-$1200 for the inverter (depending on how many Watt it needs to support), batteries are about $320 per 1.2kwh. You may need multiple to support peak load so say 4 of those batters for $1280. Step-up transformers are maybe $100-$200 and an auto-transormer could cost about $600. So total would be about $2950 plus the cost of cables and an electrician to wire it all up.

[disclaimer] I'm not an electrician and I have no idea whether this will actually work, whether it will burn down your house or perhaps just kill you. But I'm planning to find out. [/disclaimer]
 

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In the US, where many regions (including where I live) have frequent power outages, many people have a backup generator either connected to the whole home or just to the critical load on a sub-panel with 240v split phase input (which I have). 240v split-phase is a system where two live wires transport 120v but in a different phase. The V2L function will typically not be able to handle peak loads regardless of whether it is providing backup power to the whole house or just to the critical load. However, I'm planning to create an in-home battery solution with an invertor and some off-the-shelf LFP batteries, I plan to connect the V2L output to the 240v split-phase input on the inverter as 1900w would be more than the average load in my home. So even if peak load drains the batteries for some time, the batteries will be recharging from the V2L after peak load is over. Two issues:
  • Don't know if V2L can support sustained loads at 1900w
  • In another thread, there is a link to a Kia video that states that you can't use the V2L adapter and the internal power outlet socket at the same time. Not sure if that only applies to 220v output or also to 110v output. Would appreciate it if someone in the USA can try that out.

If you can only use one port then I think what might work is a step-up transformer and then an auto-transformer to create 240v split-phase. If you can use both ports simultaneously then just the auto-transformer might be able to do the job.

The cost of the solution would be about $600-$1200 for the inverter (depending on how many Watt it needs to support), batteries are about $320 per 1.2kwh. You may need multiple to support peak load so say 4 of those batters for $1280. Step-up transformers are maybe $100-$200 and an auto-transormer could cost about $600. So total would be about $2950 plus the cost of cables and an electrician to wire it all up.

[disclaimer] I'm not an electrician and I have no idea whether this will actually work, whether it will burn down your house or perhaps just kill you. But I'm planning to find out. [/disclaimer]

what I am reading is you can run off of both outlets at the same time, you just have to start on the exterior then go to the interior. But I can’t find anything on the combined max continuous power output. All I have been able to find is 1900w 1.9kW. Idk if that’s per plug or combined with both?
 

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In the US, where many regions (including where I live) have frequent power outages, many people have a backup generator either connected to the whole home or just to the critical load on a sub-panel with 240v split phase input (which I have). 240v split-phase is a system where two live wires transport 120v but in a different phase. The V2L function will typically not be able to handle peak loads regardless of whether it is providing backup power to the whole house or just to the critical load. However, I'm planning to create an in-home battery solution with an invertor and some off-the-shelf LFP batteries, I plan to connect the V2L output to the 240v split-phase input on the inverter as 1900w would be more than the average load in my home. So even if peak load drains the batteries for some time, the batteries will be recharging from the V2L after peak load is over. Two issues:
  • Don't know if V2L can support sustained loads at 1900w
  • In another thread, there is a link to a Kia video that states that you can't use the V2L adapter and the internal power outlet socket at the same time. Not sure if that only applies to 220v output or also to 110v output. Would appreciate it if someone in the USA can try that out.

If you can only use one port then I think what might work is a step-up transformer and then an auto-transformer to create 240v split-phase. If you can use both ports simultaneously then just the auto-transformer might be able to do the job.

The cost of the solution would be about $600-$1200 for the inverter (depending on how many Watt it needs to support), batteries are about $320 per 1.2kwh. You may need multiple to support peak load so say 4 of those batters for $1280. Step-up transformers are maybe $100-$200 and an auto-transormer could cost about $600. So total would be about $2950 plus the cost of cables and an electrician to wire it all up.

[disclaimer] I'm not an electrician and I have no idea whether this will actually work, whether it will burn down your house or perhaps just kill you. But I'm planning to find out. [/disclaimer]
I wonder if a V2L adapter from a (240V) European market might work. I suspect the inverter is onboard and the V2L adapter is really just an interface to the internal (120V) inverter. But might be worth investigating.
 

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This CNET article claims 3.6kw V2L on the US spec, split between the inside outlet 16A port and the outside adapter 15A. The owners manual says you can use them both at the same time. I've used the inside one to run a camping fridge while the car was off by just plugging in the V2L adapter on the outside and turning it on (the manual states this is one of the conditions that turns the inside outlet on while the car is off).
 

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I'm having an electrician install a 6kw 240v split-chase inverter/battery charger, a 5.2kwh/48v battery, and a 110v to 48v 25amps battery charger. The inverter will have its input connected to the main panel and its output connected to our 6-group sub-panel, so as long as the main panel gets power from the grid, the inverter will provide pass-through to the sub-panel.

The battery charger will be connected to the battery, which gets connected to the 48v port of the inverter. The inverter will have its dip-switches set to never charge the battery, as that will be the job of the battery charger.

The idea is that when the power goes out, the inverter switches automatically to battery power. I'll need to connect the 110v output of the EV6 to the battery charger before the battery is exhausted and that will recharge the battery as long as the average power usage on the sub-panel is less than the power that the EV6 can provide. The battery supports peak loads of 100 amps output so that will handle peak loads when appliances or our well pump switches on, something the EV6 alone would not be able to handle.

I have no idea whether this will work but will find out soon enough :)
 

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Does the AWD version of the Wind model also have the V2L in the back seat? The only mention I've heard of having an outlet in the back seat from reviewers with the GT-Line version. I'm getting an AWD Wind model with V2L and it only mentions a 1.9 kW external V2L. I would think that if they put in V2L it would be the same in both trim lines but I can't find confirmation of that. Does anybody have a Wind with V2L and can confirm there's an outlet in the back seat?
Also has anybody measured the output with both back seat and external V2L connected, to confirm if it is in fact 1.9 kW total, or 1.9 kW external plus 1.6 kW back seat, as mentioned in that CNET article?
 

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Does the AWD version of the Wind model also have the V2L in the back seat? The only mention I've heard of having an outlet in the back seat from reviewers with the GT-Line version. I'm getting an AWD Wind model with V2L and it only mentions a 1.9 kW external V2L. I would think that if they put in V2L it would be the same in both trim lines but I can't find confirmation of that. Does anybody have a Wind with V2L and can confirm there's an outlet in the back seat?
Also has anybody measured the output with both back seat and external V2L connected, to confirm if it is in fact 1.9 kW total, or 1.9 kW external plus 1.6 kW back seat, as mentioned in that CNET article?
Confirmed. There is indeed an outlet in the back seat area on my Wind and it did come with the additional V2L adapter.
 

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Does the AWD version of the Wind model also have the V2L in the back seat? The only mention I've heard of having an outlet in the back seat from reviewers with the GT-Line version. I'm getting an AWD Wind model with V2L and it only mentions a 1.9 kW external V2L. I would think that if they put in V2L it would be the same in both trim lines but I can't find confirmation of that. Does anybody have a Wind with V2L and can confirm there's an outlet in the back seat?
Also has anybody measured the output with both back seat and external V2L connected, to confirm if it is in fact 1.9 kW total, or 1.9 kW external plus 1.6 kW back seat, as mentioned in that CNET article?
The only way to confirm that output is possible is by connecting the max possible load to both outlets. I can confirm that the owners manual states that both can be used simultaneously and that the inside one says it's rated for 16A max on the cover and that outside one says it's rated for 15A on the inside of the V2L adapter near the 5-15 receptacle.
 

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The only way to confirm that output is possible is by connecting the max possible load to both outlets. I can confirm that the owners manual states that both can be used simultaneously and that the inside one says it's rated for 16A max on the cover and that outside one says it's rated for 15A on the inside of the V2L adapter near the 5-15 receptacle.
That sounds like an official answer from the manufacturer! Thank you.
 

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I'm having an electrician install a 6kw 240v split-chase inverter/battery charger, a 5.2kwh/48v battery, and a 110v to 48v 25amps battery charger. The inverter will have its input connected to the main panel and its output connected to our 6-group sub-panel, so as long as the main panel gets power from the grid, the inverter will provide pass-through to the sub-panel.

The battery charger will be connected to the battery, which gets connected to the 48v port of the inverter. The inverter will have its dip-switches set to never charge the battery, as that will be the job of the battery charger.

The idea is that when the power goes out, the inverter switches automatically to battery power. I'll need to connect the 110v output of the EV6 to the battery charger before the battery is exhausted and that will recharge the battery as long as the average power usage on the sub-panel is less than the power that the EV6 can provide. The battery supports peak loads of 100 amps output so that will handle peak loads when appliances or our well pump switches on, something the EV6 alone would not be able to handle.

I have no idea whether this will work but will find out soon enough :)
Really interesting way to go. I would love to know how you make out. I am considering something like this but also with the addition of solar panels.
Which inverter have you chosen?
Have you calculated how long you could power your house in the event of a prolonged failure?
When the Ev batteries start to run down and if it's a local outage I guess you could drive to a fast charger for a top-up!. Better than going to the gas station to get another 5 gallons for the gas Genset and being out of power while you fill up in the dark.
 

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My house is wired to allow a portable generator to power part of my house using a transfer switch. I made this video to show how I use my EV6 to power some areas of my house in the event of a power outage.
Great video, thanks for sharing!

I suppose the NEMA 14-R30 to 5-15P only connects the live wire on the 5-15P two one of the live wires of the 240v split-phase. Do you get power to all groups on your sub-panel or only to half of them?
 

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I did additional test today with my set up. I turned on several selective switches on both sides of the transfer switch panel to be powered via the EV6 V2L adapter. The powered areas and appliances include lights in the family room, kitchen, breakfast nook, master bedroom and bathroom, two refrigerator/freezers, ceiling fans, and a curling iron totaled about 1.4kw. All were successful without any problem. My transfer switch panel does not include any 240V appliances like dryer, water heater, and A/C.
 
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