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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks. I'm an EV6 owner for a little over a week today. I had the electrical work for my Level 2 AC charger outlet finished 2 days ago and charged up my car for the first time. It was a great feeling 'refueling' in my garage while I watched TV.

I've started plowing through the Owner's Manual and saw the EV Settings of Charging Limits. I've seen the recommendations directly from Kia regarding 'too much' or 'too frequent' DC fast charging. But the Charging Limit settings apply to the AC charging too.

My question is this - why would you plug in your Level 2 AC charger and limit the charge to under 100%? Is there a technical reason or is that just a potential convenience for something like needing just 60% charge to get to work ASAP?

Thanks
Rich
 

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My question is this - why would you plug in your Level 2 AC charger and limit the charge to under 100%? Is there a technical reason or is that just a potential convenience for something like needing just 60% charge to get to work ASAP?
if you read many of the other threads on here, it is apparently the perceived wisdom that the battery's life is maximised if you charge to 80% or so max, except when you need the extra range. It is apparently especially bad to charge to 100% and leave it at or close to that level. So the worse scenario is to do relatively short daily commutes, but charge to 100% every night.
 

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The same wisdom applies to smartphones and other Lithium-ion powered devices. That's why many phones these days have options allowing you to control charge limits just like the EV6.
 

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if you read many of the other threads on here, it is apparently the perceived wisdom that the battery's life is maximised if you charge to 80% or so max, except when you need the extra range. It is apparently especially bad to charge to 100% and leave it at or close to that level. So the worse scenario is to do relatively short daily commutes, but charge to 100% every night.
Well...I guess I'm the guinea pig on this one! 60 mile roundtrip daily commute with grocery runs and errands at weekends. I subscribe to the ABC philosophy of Always Be Charging. I regularly go from sub 5% to 100% and 60% to 100% charging when at work. (Why, coz its FREE!!!) 5 days per week. I also do DCFC at 150kw & 350kw EA stations to top up charge for 220+ mile trips. Usually 6-10 times per month. At home I will often plug in to top off the charge back to 100%.
Currently at 10,300 miles in just under 4 months of this charging behavior- and not observed any ill effects. For the first month I used DCFC exclusively, every chance I got.
Always to 100%...
I don't plan on keeping my GTL FE more than 2years. Just waiting for my tarmac terrorizing EV GT early next year.

If weird stuff occurs or anything noticeable I will 100% update the forums. Personally I feel that life is too short to strip away all the enjoyment of an EV with hyper mileage techniques, pedantic charging and miserly use of sport mode.
 

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Hi folks. I'm an EV6 owner for a little over a week today. I had the electrical work for my Level 2 AC charger outlet finished 2 days ago and charged up my car for the first time. It was a great feeling 'refueling' in my garage while I watched TV.

I've started plowing through the Owner's Manual and saw the EV Settings of Charging Limits. I've seen the recommendations directly from Kia regarding 'too much' or 'too frequent' DC fast charging. But the Charging Limit settings apply to the AC charging too.

My question is this - why would you plug in your Level 2 AC charger and limit the charge to under 100%? Is there a technical reason or is that just a potential convenience for something like needing just 60% charge to get to work ASAP?

Thanks
Rich
My research suggests that you should charge it when you have to, normally up to 90% because there is a reserve capacity specifically to avoid overcharging. Just don't let it sit for a long time in either a fully charged or fully depleted state (both are considered bad for the battery).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
if you read many of the other threads on here, it is apparently the perceived wisdom that the battery's life is maximised if you charge to 80% or so max, except when you need the extra range. It is apparently especially bad to charge to 100% and leave it at or close to that level. So the worse scenario is to do relatively short daily commutes, but charge to 100% every night.
Assuming it does apply to battery life (and not some sort of convenience), is there anything out there that is more engineering-based than perceived wisdom? Does Kia have any hard recommendations for Level 2 AC charging like they do for the fast DC charging?
 

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I had an outlet in my garage that would trip the L1 charger to fail state at full rate, so having that ability allowed me to charge at a slower speed. I'm sure that's a lot of it, too.
 

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Assuming it does apply to battery life (and not some sort of convenience), is there anything out there that is more engineering-based than perceived wisdom? Does Kia have any hard recommendations for Level 2 AC charging like they do for the fast DC charging?
The engineering reasons have nothing to do with AC or DC charging. In fact, there's no such thing as AC charging. It's all DC. AC input is converted internally to DC. The difference is in the amount of current the battery is being charged at, and the higher this rate, the more heat, which is bad for the battery. High heat is bad due to higher levels of corrosion (and apparently the more likelihood of generating asses inside the cells). Keeping the battery at high charge levels is bad because the battery starts growing crystals that degrade or destroy the cell. So, AC charging is better due to lower heat being generated. By that logic, shorter charges at low currents are better, though there is an active cooling system for these batteries, so it's probably not that significant for the EV6.
 

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The same wisdom applies to smartphones and other Lithium-ion powered devices. That's why many phones these days have options allowing you to control charge limits just like the EV6.
That used to be true 5 or more years ago but not now. Also many of these myths are derived from use of NiCAD batteries.
It's been known for many years that mobile phones have batteries that are more intelligent charging circuits and that the reported charge state that is shown is not real. There is an extra margin which is not declared to the operating system so that when the operating system sees 100% charge the battery is really at something like 90%. This enables the battery to protect itself from overcharging.
Also Android is very clever at charging phones these days especially from Android 10 or 11 onwards and going to 100% is OK.
The biggest danger to lithium batteries is not charging any more, but heat. Granted if charging makes your battery hot then that can cause problems for the longevity of the battery and you may need to consider using a lower charging amperage. But that's mostly because you are charging the battery outside of it's specs.
They'll be plenty of safety mechanisms built in to the EV6 charging and battery systems. Kia (and any other car manufacturers) are not going to risk millions of warranty claims in 5 or more years due to significant battery degradation, it would end them!
 

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2022 Gravity Blue EV6 AWD w/ Tech Package
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Assuming it does apply to battery life (and not some sort of convenience), is there anything out there that is more engineering-based than perceived wisdom? Does Kia have any hard recommendations for Level 2 AC charging like they do for the fast DC charging?
Here is a link with data on prolonging Li ion battery life (How to prolong Li based batteries)
 

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What I understand is since each cells or modules in the battery pack will have slightly different capacity so limit charging to less than 100% limit the energy given to smaller capacity cells. This can avoid thermal runaway to those smaller cell and you know heat is bad for battery. I found this article:

 

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lithium packs don't like to sit at high or low states of charge, especially in the heat. you should always use the middle of the pack if you can, and avoid charging to 100 percent unless you are going to immediately drive it down. especially in summer. caring for your battery in this way can reduce degradation significantly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the replies, inputs, and links folks.
As I digest it all, for what it is worth, I stumbled on the following in the Kia Access app in the information link (the lower case i in the yellow circle) adjacent to REMOTE BATTERY.

Font Screenshot Darkness Monochrome photography Terrestrial plant
 

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Obviously, our EV6s are too new to have much history .. but you can look to Tesla for battery degradation stats. At 100K miles, the chart looks to be 6% average with a high of 10% and a low of 3%.

So if you drove a 310 Wind RWD for 100K miles, you can expect a range loss from 10 miles to 30 miles depending on how much stress you put on the battery. For me, it makes no difference if I charge to 60% instead of 100% for my daily driving -- hence, I'd much rather be more conservative instead of being constantly ready for a 300 mile non-stop drive at a drop of a pin.
 

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As others have said, this is purely a matter of trying to eke out every last bit of battery efficiency long term. That probably is not a necessity for most, so go ahead and charge to 100 percent if that is you. If you care about getting a few extra miles of range and plan to own your Kia for many years, then change the charge to a lower value. keep in mind that the EV6 is warrantied for 10 years at guaranteed 80 percent efficiency, so that is the floor.
 

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Hate to keep bringing my Leaf into this forum.. but, real world experience. My 2013 Leaf has a setting for 'Long Life Battery', it limits the charge to 80%. The guy I bought it from used this frequently. I use it most of the time as well unless I need the the full 100% range. It's a nearly 10 year old EV (68K on the odo), and the battery health is 11 out of 12 bars. Most of the used Leaf's I've seen around this era, the batteries are trashed. The Leaf has such a limited range already, reducing the capacity really hurts, so I mind the battery charging.

As for the EV6's. I'm sure you could really charge the thing to 100% most all of the time and not see a lot of degradation. As others have said, the manufactures have built in some headroom, so you never really get to '100%' of the true capacity. If you look at the battery as a consumable, then by all means, charge baby charge!
 
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