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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you consider on your electric bill now if you are home charging?

I have a flat rate. It is .17 per KwH. My electric bill is $400 a month these hot summer days.

I have a solar charging plan already. Just need more money on that project.

I have lived in my same home 20 years. When I first got here it was .09 per KwH charge rate. those $225 to $250 bills seemed high then, but these $400 are crazy.

Now next week I slap a Level 2 240V 50amp service charger on my KwH usage.

So if you home charge did you see that increase?

What if you commute 125 miles round trip per day, 6 days a week working? How does that break down in charging per night those 6 days?

Does anyone still have the good ole days of less than 10 cents per KwH ?
 

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If you average 3.6Mi/kWH (a low end estimate for highway driving with the AC on) then your commute will consume roughly 35kWh. That equates to about $6. There are numerous losses to consider along the path that will affect that number by a small degree. On a 48A EVSE you’re looking at somewhere close to 4-4.25hr to charge up to 100% when you consider 35kWh divided by 11.5kW minus charge curve slow downs. You won’t be using the full output of your EVSE for the entire duration of the charge cycle. At 80% it will drop by a considerable percentage. The it will continually drop until it reaches 100% SoC. I could extrapolate a closer estimate from my charge stats but it doesn’t seem important enough to this discussion to care. Average estimates are enough to get an idea of what to expect.

Electric bills fascinate me. They’re all over the map based on the homes age and energy efficiency. Our home is 2700sq ft and was completed in late 2019. Our electricity cost is a fixed rate at $.12/kWh through Duke Energy. We moved in late March 2020. We keep our house around 68-70 in the summer and I’ve never seen an electric bill higher than $240. And that’s with charging a Chevy Volt everyday. We have a heat pump and gas water heater. Our gas bill is only $11-13 in the summer. In winter our power bill drops to the low $100s and our gas bill hits $145-170 range. So roughly the equivalent cost. I estimate that our bill should increase $40-60 a month with the additional energy usage for charging the EV6 based on my wife’s average miles driven per month. We were displaced for a few months and haven’t yet received a bill with any charging at the house included on it. I’ll know more when I get the August bill in mid September.
 

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2022 EV6 GT-L RWD, 1973 Triumph TR6
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Sorry for the long answer.
In Las Vegas, I’m on a net metering (solar; the * below) TOU, with EV rider (ORS-REVRR-TOU*). It’s a little crazy and I have a chart that explains it if anyone wants to see it.

All prices are per kWh
Summer Months: June 1-Sept 30
Summer peak: 1p-7p: $0.35585
Summer off peak: 7:01p-8a next day: $0.0564
Summer weekends: All day: $0.0564

Winter Months: Oct 1-May 31
Peak, all days, 8a-10p: $0.06192
Off peak, all days: 10:01p-8:00a next day: $0.0564
My current net metering plan is no longer available and runs until June 1, 2038.

The ChargePoint Flex has the ability to pull the appropriate rates when I select my plan so it can guesstimate my cost based on the kWh supplied. I have it set start charging at 7:05pm, it has 5minute increments, weekdays and all hrs, 12am-12am. Scheduling has been flawless, knock on wood. LOL
 

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I just got put on a time of use plan here in GA. I now pay 8.6 cents / kwh off-peak and 19.1 cents on-peak. On peak is 3pm - 8pm, weekdays, from june -> october. Everything else is off-peak. But, I also pay a $200 tax / yr for owning an EV here, so it's not all great.
 

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What do you consider on your electric bill now if you are home charging?

I have a flat rate. It is .17 per KwH. My electric bill is $400 a month these hot summer days.

I have a solar charging plan already. Just need more money on that project.

I have lived in my same home 20 years. When I first got here it was .09 per KwH charge rate. those $225 to $250 bills seemed high then, but these $400 are crazy.

Now next week I slap a Level 2 240V 50amp service charger on my KwH usage.

So if you home charge did you see that increase?

What if you commute 125 miles round trip per day, 6 days a week working? How does that break down in charging per night those 6 days?

Does anyone still have the good ole days of less than 10 cents per KwH ?
lol that seems a dream world to us in the UK which is like California without the sun 😉

Our standard rates are .50 upwards although we have a cheap tariff overnight around .2
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Gosh, I have been with TXU for 10 years. It was TNMP whom owns the power lines still today but when they billed me it was .09 cents. So the bad on my service now is I get charged .14 per KwH by TXU, but TNMP then gets a percentage of use and that drives the overall cost to .17 KWh.

I need to get my solar panels soon. I have the inverters and batteries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you average 3.6Mi/kWH (a low end estimate for highway driving with the AC on) then your commute will consume roughly 35kWh. That equates to about $6. There are numerous losses to consider along the path that will affect that number by a small degree. On a 48A EVSE you’re looking at somewhere close to 4-4.25hr to charge up to 100% when you consider 35kWh divided by 11.5kW minus charge curve slow downs. You won’t be using the full output of your EVSE for the entire duration of the charge cycle. At 80% it will drop by a considerable percentage. The it will continually drop until it reaches 100% SoC. I could extrapolate a closer estimate from my charge stats but it doesn’t seem important enough to this discussion to care. Average estimates are enough to get an idea of what to expect.

Electric bills fascinate me. They’re all over the map based on the homes age and energy efficiency. Our home is 2700sq ft and was completed in late 2019. Our electricity cost is a fixed rate at $.12/kWh through Duke Energy. We moved in late March 2020. We keep our house around 68-70 in the summer and I’ve never seen an electric bill higher than $240. And that’s with charging a Chevy Volt everyday. We have a heat pump and gas water heater. Our gas bill is only $11-13 in the summer. In winter our power bill drops to the low $100s and our gas bill hits $145-170 range. So roughly the equivalent cost. I estimate that our bill should increase $40-60 a month with the additional energy usage for charging the EV6 based on my wife’s average miles driven per month. We were displaced for a few months and haven’t yet received a bill with any charging at the house included on it. I’ll know more when I get the August bill in mid September.
I will have the car in use in about 2 weeks on this work journey. Sadly it is alot of red light to red light with only one section at 65MPH for about 10 minutes. Alot of 40 MPH .. Cant wait to see how this works out compared to the 2022 Lexus RX450H currently on this path. It gets the solid 31MPG city it is rated battery and ICE together. I plan to trade the Lexus in on the new EV6 GT if I like this GT-Line enough to be all electric and dump the Hybrid. I didnt want the RX450H, I wanted the NX350H as it is rated 41MPG with the battery and ICE. Of course there was zero NX series in March and all sold out up to 2023 already.
 

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lol that seems a dream world to us in the UK which is like California without the sun 😉

Our standard rates are .50 upwards although we have a cheap tariff overnight around .2
I don't know where you are in the UK, for me our rate for electricity is £0.27 per kWh. Even if I took an electric car tariff (basically cheaper at night) it would jump to £0.38 during the day and £0.08 during the night

I haven't got the car yet, but even then crunching the numbers I don't think I would change from the basic rate
 

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I will have the car in use in about 2 weeks on this work journey. Sadly it is alot of red light to red light with only one section at 65MPH for about 10 minutes. Alot of 40 MPH .. Cant wait to see how this works out compared to the 2022 Lexus RX450H currently on this path. It gets the solid 31MPG city it is rated battery and ICE together. I plan to trade the Lexus in on the new EV6 GT if I like this GT-Line enough to be all electric and dump the Hybrid. I didnt want the RX450H, I wanted the NX350H as it is rated 41MPG with the battery and ICE. Of course there was zero NX series in March and all sold out up to 2023 already.
Honestly it won’t be that bad. The car will essentially drive itself in stop and go traffic assuming there is always a car ahead of you. You’ll just need to press the cruise button to get rolling again. And you’ll probably get higher efficiency so your daily costs will go down. My wife only drives City so our efficiency is around 4.2-4.5mi per kWh. So we get over 300 miles on a full charge. That GT is going to make you wanna have a heavy foot though and that will bring it back down.
 

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I'm in Columbia, MO. There's no peak/off-peak rate, but we do have seasonal rates. At the max tier (where we always land), we pay .15 kWh during summer (4 months) and .09 (special heat pump rate) non-summer. Our home is ~40 years old and about 3,600 sq/ft so the monthly electric bill is (was*) in the low three digits.

* We installed 11.8 kWh of rooftop solar which brought our bill down to $50-ish per month -- about $2,000/year ROI.

We charge the EV6 every 5-6 days, from ~20 to 80; and to 100 if we leave for a road trip. Except for road trips, we charge exclusively at home.
 

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I have a flat rate. It is .17 per KwH.

Now next week I slap a Level 2 240V 50amp service charger on my KwH usage.

What if you commute 125 miles round trip per day, 6 days a week working? How does that break down in charging per night those 6 days?
Depending on your commute, your right foot, and your EV6 model you'll get between 2.6 and 3.6 miles per KwH. If you drive 125 miles x 5 you'll be running up at least 625 miles a week.

At your $0.17 KwH rate that'll cost you in around $29.51 to $40.86. To be safe figure 10% charging inefficiency so you're looking at $33- $45 a month in additional electricity costs. That calculation covers only your commute miles, and only if charging at home at your specified rate.
 

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I’m paying $0/kwh. I was oversold on my solar panels before i got my EV6, but still only pay 324/month for the finance payment on the panels. They produce more than enough for both house and EV6. Its a really great feeling to be essentially driving for free!
 

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I installed my own solar system at 13.86kw for only 16k. With 2 EVs, my ROI is looking like 3 years tops. My price is .11/kwh so it's pretty dang low but even still, the ROI is super short when you are smart/thrifty about how to do solar.
 

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^ all the more reason to do your parts to mitigate the use of fossil fuels to charge your EV. Easiest way is solar. My average daily (factoring high production and low production days) is 45.2 kwh which is enough for roughly 120-150 miles of range per day between both our vehicles.
 

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I don't know where you are in the UK, for me our rate for electricity is £0.27 per kWh. Even if I took an electric car tariff (basically cheaper at night) it would jump to £0.38 during the day and £0.08 during the night

I haven't got the car yet, but even then crunching the numbers I don't think I would change from the basic rate
Was quoting in Cents 40 ( mine day rate is 30 p) 20 cents my night rate is 16 pence

South east your overnight seems cheap
 

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I’m in WA state and close to the Columbia River Gorge where there’s a ton of wind and hydroelectric production. Our electricity is cheap, 0.082/kwh so we’re very lucky. We got our solar panels installed a few months back so now our electricity/gas bill is gone, just pay the loan on the panels which is $106/month. I have a 35 mile one way commute, 4 days/week for work so we’re super lucky cause gas is not cheap in our state!
 
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